Posts Tagged ‘wall street journal’

Stephen Hicks’s article published in The Wall Street Journal

Monday, May 2nd, 2016

wsj logoStephen Hicks’s article “What Entrepreneurs Can Teach Us All About Life” has been published by The Wall Street Journal. Here is a snippet:

“We often think of entrepreneurs as larger-than-life characters. They take big risks. They make their own rules. They innovate and experiment, questioning things everybody else takes for granted.

“It can almost seem like entrepreneurs are a breed apart. But they’re not. All of us are born with the ability to take risks, think creatively and challenge the everyday way of doing things. And as hokey as this can sound, we would all do well to tap into those traits in both our lives and our careers, whether we work for ourselves or not …”

Read the article at their site here.

 

Chicago’s Start-Up Ecosystem

Monday, March 26th, 2012

Funding for Chicago based start-ups from venture capital firms and angel investors is up. The number of collaborative work spaces and social support programs for entrepreneurs are increasing. Chicago is becoming a great place for entrepreneurship.

Read the article at The Wall Street Journal.

Dilbert Creator Scott Adams on Getting a Real Education

Monday, April 18th, 2011

In a humorous and inspiring piece in The Wall Street Journal, Scott Adams (creator of the popular Dilbert comic strip) writes that most college students should learn the skills needed to run a business, which will prepare them for post-graduate life. Mr. Adams touches on several of his clever entrepreneurial ideas as a student that allowed him to master “the strange art of transforming nothing into something,” and he gives some excellent advice to burgeoning entrepreneurs.

Read the article here.

New Businesses, Not Small Businesses, Create Jobs

Monday, December 14th, 2009

NYSEHow can we create more jobs?

“The conventional wisdom is that [small] businesses account for half of the labor force and are therefore the engine of future job creation. That’s not quite the case. The more precise factor is not the size of businesses, but rather their age,” say Carl Schramm, Robert Litan, and Dane Stangler.

Read the rest at the Wall Street Journal.