Posts Tagged ‘Stephen Hicks’

Stephen Hicks lecture tour in Poland

Monday, February 13th, 2017

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EP-Polish-slant-1024x768From January 6-16 Stephen Hicks gave a total of eight talks in Poland: Bydgoszcz, Chojnice, Warszawa, and Kraków. Several of the talks are tied to the newly-published Polish edition of his Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault.

The Polish translation by Piotr Kostyło and Katarzyna Nowak was published as Zrozumieć postmodernizm. Sceptycyzm i socjalizm od Rousseau do Foucaulta (University of Kasimir the Great Press, 2016).

Much thanks to the following individuals for their warm invitations: Dr. Przemek Zientkowski of Chojnice, Professor Hanna Kostyło of the Bydgoszcz University, Professor Rafał Godoń of the University of Warsaw,
Professor Katarzyna Wrońska of Jagiellonian University in Kraków, and especially to Dr. Piotr Kostyło of the University of Kasimir the Great.

Stephen Hicks’s article published at The Savvy Street

Wednesday, May 11th, 2016

The_Savvy_StreetStephen Hicks’s article “The Moral High Ground of Free Trade” has been published at The Savvy Street. Read the article here at their site.

Interview with Stephen Hicks at FEE

Thursday, May 5th, 2016

An interview with Stephen Hicks about Capitalism versus the Philosophers has been published at the Foundation for Economic Education’s site. Read the interview here.

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Stephen Hicks’s article published in The Wall Street Journal

Monday, May 2nd, 2016

wsj logoStephen Hicks’s article “What Entrepreneurs Can Teach Us All About Life” has been published by The Wall Street Journal. Here is a snippet:

“We often think of entrepreneurs as larger-than-life characters. They take big risks. They make their own rules. They innovate and experiment, questioning things everybody else takes for granted.

“It can almost seem like entrepreneurs are a breed apart. But they’re not. All of us are born with the ability to take risks, think creatively and challenge the everyday way of doing things. And as hokey as this can sound, we would all do well to tap into those traits in both our lives and our careers, whether we work for ourselves or not …”

Read the article at their site here.

 

Stephen Hicks’s article to be published in The Wall Street Journal

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016

wsj logoOn May 2, The Wall Street Journal will publish Stephen Hicks’s article “What Entrepreneurs Can Teach Us All About Life.” Here is the opening snippet:

“We often think of entrepreneurs as larger-than-life characters. They take big risks. They make their own rules. They innovate and experiment, questioning things everybody else takes for granted.

“It can almost seem like entrepreneurs are a breed apart. But they’re not. All of us are born with the ability to take risks, think creatively and challenge the everyday way of doing things. And as hokey as this can sound, we would all do well to tap into those traits in both our lives and our careers, whether we work for ourselves or not …”

We will post more when the article is published on Monday, May 2.

Entrepreneurial Education conference at Rockford University, March 14

Wednesday, February 10th, 2016

[JPEG] E Conference Poster
The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship will be hosting a conference at Rockford University, March 14, 2016, on Entrepreneurial Education.

Invited speakers include: Stephen Hicks (Illinois), Bernardita Jensen (Santiago, Chile), Michael Strong (Austin, Texas), Albert Loan (Guatemala), Magatte Wade (Dakar, Senegal), Jed Hopkins (Madison, Wisconsin), Piotr Kostylo (Poland), Khalil Habib (Providence, Rhode Island), and keynote speaker John Chisholm (San Francisco, California) on “An Entrepreneur’s Perspective on Entrepreneurial Education.”

Free Registration here. (Lunch and refreshments included.)

Theme:

On the Entrepreneurial side of the phrase: We live in entrepreneurial times. From the work demand side, there is increasing proportion of employment within entrepreneurial firms and a slow upward trend in the number of startups. From the work-supply side, younger people of this generation express higher levels of aspiration to start their own businesses or to work within entrepreneurial firms. Increasing globalization and liberalization also mean that the entrepreneurial trends are not only regional or national.

On the Education side: How can we best help younger people become entrepreneurial—either to prepare them for creating their own businesses, or to be entrepreneurial within existing firms, or as freelancing artists, writers, and musicians? If the traditional model of education—students sitting in straight rows of desks and all doing the same work at the same time following the directions of an authority figure—does not prepare students for entrepreneurism, then what should we replace it with?

We also live in a time of dissatisfaction with the dominant forms of education, with many complaints about stagnant or declining outcomes, bureaucratization, demoralization and worse, especially in poorer neighborhoods.

And we live in times of disruptive education technologies—from simple email and online chat to pre-packaged podcasts and video series to robust online MOOCs and more.

apple-176x100Putting all of the above together, how do we answer this question: What should entrepreneurial education look like?

Free Registration here. (Lunch and refreshments included.)

Here is a PDF of the Conference Poster.

This conference is made possible in part by support from the John Templeton Foundation.

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Book chapter forthcoming: “Entrepreneurship’s Relationship to CSR”

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Stephen Hicks has a chapter forthcoming in this new volume:

CSR, Sustainability, Ethics & Governance: Building New Bridges between Business and Society

Editors: Hualiang Lu (Nanjing, China), René Schmidpeter (Cologne, Germany), Nicholas Capaldi (New Orleans, USA), Liangrong Zu, (Turin, Italy)
Publisher: Springer Books.
Date: 2016

Abstract:

Entrepreneurship’s Relationship to CSR (Prof. Dr. Stephen R.C. Hicks)

This chapter rethinks the start of business ethics. The author agrees that the Corporate Social Responsibility model of business ethics has been a leading paradigm. But the author notices that CSR practitioners usually take large firms as representative of business and address their ethical issues; this, he believes, leads to over-generalizing. But most people do not work in mid-to-large corporations; rather, they are sole proprietors, in a partnership, in a family firm, or in an entrepreneurial venture. Also, every large corporation began as an entrepreneurial venture. Therefore, the author argues that business ethics should begin where business begins. In other words, business ethics begins with entrepreneurship. The author first situates ethics in an entrepreneurial context to identify the core values, virtues, and vices of business. Then he addresses how those ethical issues scale as the business succeeds or fails at growing into large corporation.

[More information forthcoming upon publication.]

The Capitalist Heart Surgeon, Silicon Valley’s Start-up Machine, Advice for Success, Censorship and Business, Hicks on Poverty to Prosperity, Defining Competition

Friday, August 9th, 2013

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Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

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The Capitalist Heart Surgeon
Dr.-Devi-ShettyDubbed “India’s Walmart of Heart Surgery,” Devi Shetty is a heart surgeon-turned-businessman who has cut the cost of heart surgery by 98 percent to just US$1,555. The same procedure costs US$106,385 at Ohio’s Cleveland Clinic. This article explains that Shetty keeps the costs low in his 21 medical centers by buying cheaper scrubs, using air conditioning only in the most essential rooms, and through other efficiencies..
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Silicon Valley’s Start-up Machine
silicon-valleys-most-important-startup-factory-y-combinator-is-shrinkingY Combinator is an organization founded by Paul Graham that accelerates the early phases for start-ups. Its first graduating class in 2005 included Reddit, Infogami, Dropbox, Airbnb, and Stripe. Y Combinator holds two three-month sessions every year. During that time, start-up founders receive mentoring at regular meetings with each of Y Combinator’s partners. Read more.

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Censorship Inhibiting Entrepreneurship in Quebec
censorshipAccording to the province of Quebec’s censors, “Wellarc” is too English to be used as a business name. The entrepreneur who proposed the name is Xavier Menard, a 17 year old from Quebec. Menard is up against Quebec’s Bill 101, which requires that businesses in Quebec have French names and signs. According to this article, Menard responded to the government with a video in which he argues that it doesn’t make sense to limit the choices of Quebec businesses when the province has a high unemployment rate..
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Essential Advice for Success
bob-lefsetzAccording to Bob Lefsetz, embracing individuality is an essential cornerstone to success. Other factors include: the personal touch, quality over quantity, and understanding that talent is not god-given. According to Lefstez, “None of us are perfect, we can all improve, we all make mistakes. But let me be clear, ignore the haters, ignore advice unless you’re asking for it.” Read the article..

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From Poverty to Prosperity
saupload_poverty_to_prosperityIn this post, Stephen Hicks enthusiastically reviews Arnold Kling and Nick Schulz’s From Poverty to Prosperity: Intangible Assets, Hidden Liabilities and the Lasting Triumph over Scarcity. Hicks likes the authors’ emphasis on the foundational economic role of entrepreneurs, their insistence upon the study of real human agents, and their assumption that “win-win social relations are normal and the proper benchmark, not the usual expectation of zero-sum.”.

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Defining Competition
sports ethicistAs part of a recent seminar, Shawn Klein (a.k.a. the Sports Ethicist), developed a genus-species definition of competition. What do competition in business and sports have in common? Is war properly described as a competition? Are two animals fighting over mates or food competing? Klein elaborates on why certain aspects of competition were rejected and others included. Read more.

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See you in two weeks!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.


The Frontier of Diagnostic Medicine, Business without Bosses, Interns Sue over Wages, Advice from Elite Entrepreneurs, Entrepreneurial Education, Explaining Postmodernism

Friday, July 26th, 2013

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Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

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The Frontier of Diagnostic Medicine
iknife New developments in medical technology are paving the way for longer, healthier lives. In this article, Ray Kurzweil discusses the iKnife, which uses an electrical current to diagnose cancer. And this article explains how the use of “smart” pills to monitor everything “from your vitals to blood flow to temperature in real time” could be mainstream as early as 2014..
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Business without Bosses
PGreenIn this interview, Paul Green, Jr. from the Morning Star Self-Management Institute explains Morning Star’s innovative business model that focuses on self-responsibility and self-management over bureaucracies and bosses. According to Green, this model is premised on “a principle that basically states: to the degree people do all that they agree to do, and don’t initiate force against others or their property, happiness and prosperity will emerge.” Read more about Morning Star’s business vision..

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Interns Sue Over Wages
money-bags3Historically, unpaid internships have offered college students invaluable on-the-job training and education. However, in two recent cases, interns have filed lawsuits for lack of payment against the companies that provided them with internships. This article details the lawsuits against Condé Nast and NBC Universal. Read the complaint against NBC Universal.

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New Chapter from Audiobook Version of Explaining Postmodernism
explaining postmodernismThe sixth and final chapter from Stephen Hicks’s Explaining Postmodernism audiobook has been released. In this chapter, “Postmodern Strategy,” Hicks discusses Rorty’s, Foucault’s, and Derrida’s contribution to postmodernist strategy — and its political implications: “Why has a leading segment of the political Left adopted skeptical and relativist epistemological strategies?”

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Advice from Elite Entrepreneurs
Entrepreneur MindYou should put your job before your family. You should disregard your passion in favor of practicality. These unusual-sounding pieces of advice come from some of the most successful entrepreneurs in the world. In his new book, The Entrepreneur Mind, serial entrepreneur Kevin D. Johnson outlines 100 essential beliefs, insights, and habits of serious entrepreneurs. Read 10 gems from the book in this Forbes article.

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An Online Master’s Degree in Computer Science?
online-degreeThe Georgia Institute of Technology has created a solution to America’s shortage of computer-science experts. According to this Wall Street Journal article, Georgia Tech is now offering an online master’s degree in computer science. This new offering not only allows more people to participate in the degree program, but it costs students just a quarter of the cost of a typical degree.

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See you in two weeks!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.


Wearable Technology, Regulators vs. Mom Entrepreneur, Quantifying Regulation, Hayek on Intellectuals and Nazis, Solving Mankind’s Biggest Problems, (Breast) Feeding Frenzy

Friday, July 12th, 2013

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Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

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Fashion Meets Technology
13-GoogleGlassModel_1_620x465Technology is quickly becoming a fashion statement. A short list of trendy technologies include: Apple iWatch, Apple smart shoes, Google Glass, Nike+ FuelBand, and LUMOback, an 8.55 mm-thick sensor worn on a belt around the waist that wirelessly tracks movement and activity. Read more about the latest developments in wearable technology.

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Volunteers Not Allowed
Rhea Lana ToysRhea Lana Riner, entrepreneur and mother of three, created a consignment business that uses an innovative business model: Customers at rented pop-up locations could volunteer to set up the sale in exchange for dibs on shopping. This new model caught the attention of the Department of Labor, which decided that Riner’s volunteers should be treated as employees. Has Riner treated her customers unfairly? Or is Riner being “stifled by outmoded dictates?” Read the article.

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Quantifying Regulation at the Mercatus Center
CHP_Commerce_Trade_BooksDetermined to change the flawed methodologies in most statistics on government regulation, Patrick A. McLaughlin, Omar Al-Ubaydli, and the Mercatus Center at George Mason University have developed RegData, “the first tool to allow for industry-specific quantification of federal regulation, permitting within-industry and between-industry analyses of the causes and effects of federal regulations.”

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Hayek on Intellectuals and the Nazis
hayek-1 In this post, Stephen Hicks looks at Friedrich Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom, which was published at the height of World War II. Hicks points out that the intellectual activism of such socialist thinkers as Werner Sombart, Johann Plenge, Friedrich Nauman, Paul Lensch, Moeller van den Bruck, and Oswald Spengler caused Hayek to believe that “Germany’s brightest minds developed the theory and laid the cultural groundwork for the Nazi political transformation.”

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We are Solving Mankind’s Biggest Problems
Abundance_book_cover-212x299In this article, the Atlas Society’s Edward Hudgins reviews two books: Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think by Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler, and Merchants of Despair: Radical Environmentalists, Criminal Pseudo-Scientists, and the Fatal Cult of Antihumanism by Robert Zubrin. While each book takes a different approach, Hudgins concludes that both “offer us components for a new Enlightenment synthesis that can usher in profound cultural changes well beyond the particulars in the pages of these books.”

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(Breast) Feeding Frenzy at the University of Virginia
Paul Tudor JonesHow difficult is it for women to combine high-powered careers with motherhood? Paul Tudor Jones, a hedge fund manager and donor to the University of Virginia, recently incited the opposition of media outlets, the Provost, and 82 faculty members. At a panel discussion on financial trading at the University’s McIntire School of Commerce, Jones stated, “[I]t is difficult for mothers to be successful traders because connecting with a child is a focus ‘killer’ … . As soon as that baby’s lips touched that girl’s bosom, forget it.” Read John Rosenberg’s assessment of the fallout from Jones’s incendiary remarks.

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See you in two weeks!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.