Posts Tagged ‘Sports Symposium’

KWR: Crony Capitalism, Tragedy of the Commons, Sports Symposium, Competition is Good, Pixar

Friday, April 26th, 2013


Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.

Editor: Virginia Murr

Blasting Crony Capitalism
University of Chicago professor Luigi Zingales recently gave a lecture sponsored by the Pope Foundation in which he highlighted the arguments from his new book, A Capitalism for the People: Recapturing the Lost Genius of American Prosperity. According to Zingales, “The goal should not be to kill the free-market system, but to kill the crony component of the free-market system.” Read more.

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The Tragedy of the Commons
In his latest Business Ethics series release, Stephen Hicks examines the classic tragedy of the commons. The video-lecture includes a comparison and contrast between the free market and socialist solutions to the tragedy. For more cases in the series, click here.

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Radio Review of Fantasy and Fandom
The Sports Ethicist sat down with Chad Carlson, John Harney, Trisha Phillips, Aaron Harper, Andrew Koehl, Carl Robinson, and Mike Perry on Rockford University Radio to discuss the themes of the April 19th Sports Symposium dedicated to Fantasy and Fandom. Listen to or download the show.

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Competition is Good for You
According to Stanford’s Bill Barnett, your strategy professor was wrong. Competition is not bad for your company. On the contrary, competition can be the key to your company’s success. In this article, Barnett explains the many benefits to competition and why many business schools get it wrong.

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Lessons from Pixar
In this interview (pdf) with The McKinsey Quarterly, Pixar’s Academy-Award-winning director Brad Bird explains how Pixar’s management philosophy and dedication to innovation helped them to grow from a small computer-animation studio to a multi-billion dollar company.

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Join Us in Our Mission
In our mission, we give special focus to the ethical infrastructure of an entrepreneurial society, as we believe that this is necessary to human flourishing. Please join us by making a donation today through the PayPal link or you can find information on snail-mail at our website.

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See you next week!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

KWR: Chisholm, Dangerous Things Taught in School, Heroism, Business Ethics, Sports Symposium

Friday, April 19th, 2013

Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr
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9 Dangerous Things You Were Taught in School
We didn’t just learn reading, writing, and arithmetic in school; we learned innumerable life lessons along the way. This Forbes article argues that school subtly teaches us such lessons as blindly following authority, never questioning the status quo, and that individual value can be standardized. As the author states: “Be aware of the insidious and unspoken lessons you learned as a child. To thrive in the world outside the classroom, you’re going to have to unlearn them.”

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Do We Have the Ability to be Heroes?
Who is a hero? Achilles? John Galt? Luke Skywalker? Ironman? While certainly heroic, these are fictitious figures, not real people. So can real people be heroic? Can we be heroes? Author and Professor of Leadership, Fred Kofman, suggests that “[h]eroes are not just mythical characters. They are examples of you at your best.” Read the article.

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John Chisholm and Stephen Hicks Give Talks at APEE Conference
Stephen Hicks and Kaizen interviewee John Chisholm spoke at the Association of Private Enterprise Education’s annual conference this week. Read more about Hicks’s discussion. Below is John Chisholm’s TedX talk “Release Your Inner Company.”




Business Ethics
A part of Hicks’s Business Ethics Case Studies video series, Introduction: Case Study Method, has been released. See the previously released video on Rent Control. Forthcoming case studies will include: The Tragedy of the Commons, Laetrile and Experimental Cancer Drugs, The FCC’s “Fairness Doctrine”, and Minimum Wages.


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Sports Symposium at Rockford University
Today, Professors Shawn Klein and Michael Perry are hosting a symposium on “Fandom, Fantasy, and Play.” According to professor Klein, “This year’s symposium seeks to explore and examine [the] aspects of the relationship between fan and sport.” The first panel addressing fandom will include such papers as “The Popovich-Stern Issue and Normative Implications for Professional Sports.” The second panel on fantasy will include such papers as “Fantasy Sport and Aristotelian Flourishing.” Read the abstracts.



See you next week!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

Sports Studies Symposium This Saturday, April 28

Wednesday, April 25th, 2012

The First Annual Rockford University Sports Symposium will be held this Saturday, April 28 in Grace Roper Lounge in Burpee Center at Rockford University. This event is open to everyone.

Panel #1: 10-11:30 AM

Chairperson:

Shawn E. Klein (Rockford University)

Speakers:

Erin Flynn (Ohio Wesleyan University): “On the Suárez Handball”

Tatiana Patrone (Ithaca College): “On What Running Could Be”

Christopher Johnson (University of Alberta): “Virtuous Victory”

Panel #2: 12:30-2 PM

Chairperson:

Michael Perry (Rockford University)

Speakers:

Christine Neejer (Michigan State University): “Mary Sargent Hopkins, Bicycling, and the Rhetoric of Expertise”

Christopher Garland (University of Florida): “With God on the Sideline: Religious Rhetoric in Tebowmania and the Penn State Scandal”

Jo Ann Oravec (University of Wisconsin at Whitewater): “Blogging in the Backfield: Social Media in Sport Contexts”

Click here to view a PDF of the flier.

More details at Rockford University’s blog at the Rockford Register Star.

Contact sklein[at]rockford.edu or mperry[at]rockford.edu for more information.