Posts Tagged ‘Silicon Valley’

The Capitalist Heart Surgeon, Silicon Valley’s Start-up Machine, Advice for Success, Censorship and Business, Hicks on Poverty to Prosperity, Defining Competition

Friday, August 9th, 2013

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Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

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The Capitalist Heart Surgeon
Dr.-Devi-ShettyDubbed “India’s Walmart of Heart Surgery,” Devi Shetty is a heart surgeon-turned-businessman who has cut the cost of heart surgery by 98 percent to just US$1,555. The same procedure costs US$106,385 at Ohio’s Cleveland Clinic. This article explains that Shetty keeps the costs low in his 21 medical centers by buying cheaper scrubs, using air conditioning only in the most essential rooms, and through other efficiencies..
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Silicon Valley’s Start-up Machine
silicon-valleys-most-important-startup-factory-y-combinator-is-shrinkingY Combinator is an organization founded by Paul Graham that accelerates the early phases for start-ups. Its first graduating class in 2005 included Reddit, Infogami, Dropbox, Airbnb, and Stripe. Y Combinator holds two three-month sessions every year. During that time, start-up founders receive mentoring at regular meetings with each of Y Combinator’s partners. Read more.

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Censorship Inhibiting Entrepreneurship in Quebec
censorshipAccording to the province of Quebec’s censors, “Wellarc” is too English to be used as a business name. The entrepreneur who proposed the name is Xavier Menard, a 17 year old from Quebec. Menard is up against Quebec’s Bill 101, which requires that businesses in Quebec have French names and signs. According to this article, Menard responded to the government with a video in which he argues that it doesn’t make sense to limit the choices of Quebec businesses when the province has a high unemployment rate..
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Essential Advice for Success
bob-lefsetzAccording to Bob Lefsetz, embracing individuality is an essential cornerstone to success. Other factors include: the personal touch, quality over quantity, and understanding that talent is not god-given. According to Lefstez, “None of us are perfect, we can all improve, we all make mistakes. But let me be clear, ignore the haters, ignore advice unless you’re asking for it.” Read the article..

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From Poverty to Prosperity
saupload_poverty_to_prosperityIn this post, Stephen Hicks enthusiastically reviews Arnold Kling and Nick Schulz’s From Poverty to Prosperity: Intangible Assets, Hidden Liabilities and the Lasting Triumph over Scarcity. Hicks likes the authors’ emphasis on the foundational economic role of entrepreneurs, their insistence upon the study of real human agents, and their assumption that “win-win social relations are normal and the proper benchmark, not the usual expectation of zero-sum.”.

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Defining Competition
sports ethicistAs part of a recent seminar, Shawn Klein (a.k.a. the Sports Ethicist), developed a genus-species definition of competition. What do competition in business and sports have in common? Is war properly described as a competition? Are two animals fighting over mates or food competing? Klein elaborates on why certain aspects of competition were rejected and others included. Read more.

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See you in two weeks!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.


The Watch of the Future, Netflix’s Success, Internet Ethics, Spreading Business Ethics, The Sports Ethicist, and Representational Art

Friday, May 17th, 2013

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Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

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Netflix: Back from the Brink of Destruction
house of cardsIt was a business disaster. In 2011, Netflix rolled out Qwikster, which “tried to both raise prices and spin off its DVD-by-mail business.” The media wrote scathing reviews and Netflix shares plunged. How did a Netflix CEO Reed Hastings bring his company back from the brink of destruction? According to Richard Greenfield, a media analyst for BTIG, “He [Reed] dusted himself off, stood back up and started running.” Read more.

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The Rub with Workplace Ethics
shhhWhat influences employees to speak out about ethical violations in the workplace? To find out, University of Michigan professor David Mayer and his colleagues conducted three studies. According to Mayer, the results “contradict conventional wisdom that the personal characteristics of an employee drive his or her decision to speak up.”

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The Watch of the Future
watchThis Tech Crunch article reviews the Ressence Type 3, a liquid-filled mechanical watch with a nearly featureless face that winds automatically. The dials look like they are seamlessly embedded in the face surface, which spins. As well, a pressure valve compensates for temperature-related changes in the liquid. View the product page.

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Internet Ethics Problems from Silicon Valley
mobile deviceThe Markkula Center for Applied Ethics in Silicon Valley has a web page dedicated to ethics and the Internet. The site hosts a series of brief videos on key issues in Internet ethics, as identified by Silicon Valley leaders. Participants include the co-founders of Adobe and Reputation.com, as well as the CEOs of Symantec and Seagate.

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The Future of Art
representational artIn April, Stephen Hicks attended a meeting of minds in California to discuss key issues in representational aesthetics in preparation for next year’s Representational Art Conference (TRAC). TRAC 2014 will focus on the aesthetic principles and values implicit in the representational art of the twenty-first century. The conference will be held March 2 – 5, 2014 in Ventura Beach, California.

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Taking a Swing at the Designated Hitter Rule
sports ethicistThe Sports Ethicist’s radio program recently covered the Designated Hitter Rule in MLB. The rule has been in place for 40 years, yet still remains as controversial as ever. Does it remove the need for managerial strategy? Does it add excitement and offense to the game? Listen here as Professor Shawn Klein, Zachary Wolf, Daryn Streed, as well as Professors Matt Flamm and Mike Perry discuss the DH rule and its effects on baseball.

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With summer upon us, we will be producing the Kaizen Weekly Review on a biweekly basis. See you in two weeks!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

 

Interview with entrepreneur Magatte Wade

Monday, March 25th, 2013

Forbes magazine named Magatte Wade one of the “20 Youngest Power Women of Africa.” Magatte was born in Senegal, educated in France, and started her entrepreneurial career in the U.S. Her first company, Adina World Beverages, based on indigenous Senegalese beverage recipes, became one of the most widely distributed U.S. brands started by an African entrepreneur. Her second company, Tiossan, sells skin care products based on indigenous Senegalese recipes online and at high-end boutiques. Magatte was also named a Young Global Leader by the 2011 World Economic Forum at Davos and is a frequent speaker on college campuses.

Kaizen: Where in Senegal were you born?

Wade: I was born 80 kilometers south of Dakar on the coast of the Atlantic, in a small town called M’bour. It used to be a very small town but because it’s a beach village, it’s become one of the main leisure and tourist towns.

Kaizen: The Gambia River runs from the west through Senegal?

Wade: Yes. We are about three hours north of that.

Kaizen: What was your education as a child like?

Wade: I never went to school when I was a child in Senegal. I credit a lot of who I am and my love of freedom to that—to the fact that my grandmother allowed for me not to go to school.

Kaizen: So you were raised by your grandmother primarily?

Wade: Yes, for three or four more years. Instead of going to school, I would spend all of my time playing with boys, going on expeditions, and things like that.

Kaizen: At what age did you go to Europe?

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12 Lessons Guy Kawasaki Learned from Steve Jobs

Monday, December 10th, 2012

The day after Steve Jobs’ death last year, Silicon Valley VC Guy Kawasaki gave a speech about the two times he worked under Jobs and what he learned. Some highlights from his list: Don’t listen to the experts; all that matters is whether something works or not; and value is different from price. Watch his talk below:

The World’s Top Startup Ecosystems

Monday, November 26th, 2012

Startup Genome’s 2012 report ranks the top 20 startup ecosystems in the world. The authors used interviews, case studies, surveys, and secondary data to produce the rankings.

The top ten:

1. Silicon Valley

2. Tel Aviv

3. Los Angeles

4. Seattle

5. New York City

6. Boston

7. London

8. Toronto

9. Vancouver

10. Chicago

Download the report [PDF] here.

Via Entrepreneurship.org

Related: Our interview with Judy Estrin on entrepreneurship, innovation, and Silicon Valley.

Peter Thiel’s Stanford Course on Startups

Monday, August 6th, 2012

Silicon Valley entrepreneur Blake Masters has posted in essay format his detailed notes from Peter Thiel’s Stanford course on startups. Mr. Thiel is the co-founder of PayPal, the first outside investor in Facebook, a venture capitalist, and hedge fund manger. Readers will find lots of great information on the history of startups, the tech startup bubble, the thought processes of founders, and how to begin. For example: “The path from 0 to 1 might start with asking and answering three questions. First, what is valuable? Second, what can I do? And third, what is nobody else doing?”

Read the notes here.

Start-up Chile: A Grand Innovation Experiment

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

It’s easy to understand the importance of innovators and entrepreneurs to the economy, but it’s much harder to figure out the best ways to encourage more entrepreneurship. In an article for TechCrunch, Vivek Wadhwa explores Start-Up Chile, a program that he calls “Chile’s Grand Innovation Experiment.” Most initiatives to create the next Silicon Valley have failed, Wadhwa argues, because they use a top-down approach that fatally leaves out the most important ingredient — the entrepreneurs themselves. Start-up Chile is therefore unique because, rather than building office parks and partnering with VC’s and universities, it focuses on attracting innovators and entrepreneurs from all over the world to Chile, where they will start their own businesses.

Learn more about how Start-up Chile plans to achieve this goal and watch a video about its first crop of participants here.

Interview with Reena Kapoor

Monday, February 23rd, 2009

kapoor-webReena Kapoor is the principal of Conifer Consulting, a marketing consulting firm based in Silicon Valley. A native of India, Ms. Kapoor came to the United States in 1988 to attend graduate school, received her Master’s degree from Northwestern University, and went on to work at Procter & Gamble and Kraft Foods before starting several businesses of her own. We met with Ms. Kapoor in Los Altos, California to explore her thoughts on culture and entrepreneurship and marketing strategy for entrepreneurs.

Kaizen: It is a long way from India to Silicon Valley. Where in India did you grow up?

Kapoor: Yes, it definitely is a long way. I actually grew up all over India. My father was a doctor in the army, so I had the typical nomadic army life growing up. So when I think about India—I’m from India, but sometimes it’s hard for me to pinpoint an exact region, because some of my formative years are not from my hometown, which is New Delhi, because I didn’t spend a lot of time there.

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