Posts Tagged ‘Shawn Klein’

CEE Review: Occupational licensing laws, Canadian smugglers, 16-year-old entrepreneur, Becoming productive, and more

Wednesday, June 18th, 2014

News and Opinion

fishflop2A 16-year old’s schedule combines school, dance team, and her FishFlops line of footwear and clothing.

The New York Times: the effect of licensing laws on innovation and entrepreneurship.

BBC News: Can a $7 memory stick provide digital access to the billion poorest?

Six subtle things productive people do each day. Eric Barker channeling Tim Ferriss.

Vital-Never-too-LateDangerous Canadian smuggling ring broken up by U.S. border officials. (Note disclaimer at end.)

Check out Anna Vital’s never-too-late graphic (click the image). More Anna Vital here.

Announcements

CEE and Rockford University are featured in “Alumni to the Rescue: Funding Oases of Excellence” by the American Council of Trustees & Alumni. ACTA is an organization devoted to reforming higher education.

sports-ethicistRockford University’s Shawn Klein, a.k.a. the Sports Ethicist, is planning an edited volume of essays on sport. The working title is Defining Sport: Contemporary Explorations. Here is the Call for Abstracts for the book proposal.

See you next time with our digest of new and interesting items in entrepreneurship, ethics, and political economy. Here are the previous editions of CEE Review.

Sports Studies Symposium 2014 — Call for Abstracts

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

se-thumb-180Professors Shawn Klein and Michael Perry are organizing the Third Annual Rockford University Sports Studies Symposium, to be held in April 2014. The theme is “Defining Sport.”

Here is the full Call for Abstracts.

Professor Klein is also the Sports Ethicist — check out his podcast series at iTunes.

Weighing Privacy Rights, Monsanto’s Seed Patents, Teen Innovators, Entrepreneurship for School Reform, The Crisis of Socialism, and Debating Hockey Fights

Friday, June 14th, 2013

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Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

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Do Privacy Rights Matter?
cellphonellAmericans have had a lot to digest lately. Not only was it reported that phone companies have been selling customers’ personal information to third parties, but Americans have also learned that their government has been tracking their metadata through their phones. Do Americans care? According to this summation of several surveys from the Electronic Privacy Information Center, “the importance of privacy has steadily trended upward over seven years.”.

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The Future is Bright: Amazing Teen Innovators
Teen-Phone Capacitor-2Worried about the ingenuity of our next generation? Consider this: An 18-year-old has developed a capacitor that charges cellphones in under 30 seconds. In the booming market of apps, a teen has contributed an emergency-notification app. One teen designed a low-cost, self-driving car. Another teen has created a single-person submarine. And this 15-year-old budding scientist has developed a fast, low-cost blood test to detect pancreatic cancer..

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Big Win for Monsanto’s Intellectual Property Rights
Monsanto Seeds 3Would innovation happen without intellectual property rights and the profit-motive? In a major win for intellectual property rights, the Supreme Court recently decided in Bowman v. Monsanto Co. that the farmer, Vernon Bowman, had infringed on Monsanto’s patent rights when he copied and used the seeds he yielded from a crop of Monsanto, patent-protected seeds. Read more about the case and decision.

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Is Entrepreneurship the Key to School Reform?
Student Voice Live 2At a recent event in New York, Dell and a student advocacy group, StudentVoice, hosted a day-long conference devoted to exploring ways schools can introduce entrepreneurship in the classroom. According to Zak Malamed, co-founder of StudentVoice, “Research shows that it’s entrepreneurial innovation that will lead to global economic recovery, and it’s important to nurture this entrepreneurial spirit from a young age.” Read more about the event and panelists.

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New Chapters from Audiobook Version of Explaining Postmodernism
explaining postmodernismTwo more chapters from Stephen Hicks’s Explaining Postmodernism audiobook have been released. Chapter Four takes an in-depth look at “The Climate of Collectivism” in nineteenth- and twentieth-century political thought, and Chapter Five explores how the “The Crisis of Socialism” led to Postmodernism.

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Five for Fighting: Is Hockey Fighting Justified?
sports ethicistFor many hockey fans, fights are a natural and enjoyable part of the game. But is the fighting justified? The Sports Ethicist, Shawn Klein, takes a look at the most common justifications for hockey fights. In his assessment, Klein opines that “it is a lack of sportsmanship and self-control, and overall does more harm to the sport than any purported benefits.”

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See you in two weeks!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

 


KWR: Ralph Lauren Displays Integrity in Scandal, Stay Online When the Power Goes Out, Virtue of Productiveness, Kaizen in Brazil, Classical Liberalism and Evolution, Minimum Wage Laws

Friday, May 10th, 2013

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Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

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Ralph Lauren Displays Integrity in Bribery Scandal
poloRalph Lauren discovered that one of its subsidiaries had been bribing Argentinian officials. Not only did the company report the violation to the SEC themselves, but it did so knowing that it would have to pay heavy fines for the subsidiary’s actions. According to the company’s attorney, Tom Hanusik, “Ralph Lauren did all the right things in this situation.” Read the article.

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Innovation in Connectivity
brckOur modern-era concern when a storm comes is not that we’ll lose light if the power goes out, but that we will lose the internet. Until now. Ushahidi, a non-profit technology company that builds open source software and digital tools, has created the BRCK, a convenient, portable, and durable device that can “provide failsafe internet connectivity in almost any situation.” Read more about the BRCK in this article from Forbes.

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William Thomas on the Virtue of Productiveness
William R. Thomas is currently a lecturer in the Department of Economics at the University at Albany and the director of programs for The Atlas Society. In this video, Thomas discusses productive work as the central value of life, elements of the virtue of productiveness, and the entrepreneurial concept of responsibility.
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Is Classical Liberalism Compatible with Darwinian Evolution?
darwinian evolution and classical liberalismProfessor Shawn Klein has contributed a chapter to the newly released Darwinian Evolution And Classical Liberalism: Theories in Tension, edited by Stephen Dilley. Klein states that Dilley “has pulled together an interesting and thought-provoking book,” which includes critical and dissenting opinions. Read the abstract of Klein’s chapter.

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Business Ethics Case Study: Minimum Wages
minimum wageStephen Hicks has released another case in his Business Ethics Cases series. This video lecture examines the moral, economic, and political arguments for and against minimum wage laws.

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New Issue of Kaizen Featuring Entrepreneurship in Brazil
loiferman thumbThis issue’s feature interview with entrepreneur André Loiferman, president (CEO) of the construction company Brasília Guaíba, takes us to the south of Brazil and the challenges of infrastructure as Brazil upgrades its airports, roads, ports, and other facilities in preparation for soccer’s World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016 to be held there. We also report on our recent activities at Rockford University.

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Join Us in Our Mission
The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship focuses on the ethical infrastructure of an entrepreneurial society, as we believe that this is essential to human flourishing. Please join us by making a donation today through the PayPal link or send a check via snail-mail. Thank you for your support.


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See you next week!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

KWR: Chisholm, Dangerous Things Taught in School, Heroism, Business Ethics, Sports Symposium

Friday, April 19th, 2013

Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr
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9 Dangerous Things You Were Taught in School
We didn’t just learn reading, writing, and arithmetic in school; we learned innumerable life lessons along the way. This Forbes article argues that school subtly teaches us such lessons as blindly following authority, never questioning the status quo, and that individual value can be standardized. As the author states: “Be aware of the insidious and unspoken lessons you learned as a child. To thrive in the world outside the classroom, you’re going to have to unlearn them.”

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Do We Have the Ability to be Heroes?
Who is a hero? Achilles? John Galt? Luke Skywalker? Ironman? While certainly heroic, these are fictitious figures, not real people. So can real people be heroic? Can we be heroes? Author and Professor of Leadership, Fred Kofman, suggests that “[h]eroes are not just mythical characters. They are examples of you at your best.” Read the article.

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John Chisholm and Stephen Hicks Give Talks at APEE Conference
Stephen Hicks and Kaizen interviewee John Chisholm spoke at the Association of Private Enterprise Education’s annual conference this week. Read more about Hicks’s discussion. Below is John Chisholm’s TedX talk “Release Your Inner Company.”




Business Ethics
A part of Hicks’s Business Ethics Case Studies video series, Introduction: Case Study Method, has been released. See the previously released video on Rent Control. Forthcoming case studies will include: The Tragedy of the Commons, Laetrile and Experimental Cancer Drugs, The FCC’s “Fairness Doctrine”, and Minimum Wages.


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Sports Symposium at Rockford University
Today, Professors Shawn Klein and Michael Perry are hosting a symposium on “Fandom, Fantasy, and Play.” According to professor Klein, “This year’s symposium seeks to explore and examine [the] aspects of the relationship between fan and sport.” The first panel addressing fandom will include such papers as “The Popovich-Stern Issue and Normative Implications for Professional Sports.” The second panel on fantasy will include such papers as “Fantasy Sport and Aristotelian Flourishing.” Read the abstracts.



See you next week!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

Kaizen Weekly Review

Friday, March 29th, 2013

Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

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Innovative Education: the Computer in the Wall
The winner of this year’s one million dollar TED prize and professor of educational technology at Newcastle University, Professor Sugata Mitra, set up a computer in a New Dehli slum, connected it to the internet, and placed it inside of a wall, protected only by a shield of plastic. After making the mouse accessible, he left. According to this Wired article, Mitra came back eight hours later and saw kids browsing the Internet in English, a language they do not speak.

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Should Olympic Athletes Be More Moral Than Other Athletes?
Professor Shawn Klein, a.k.a. The Sports Ethicist, discusses morality and rule-breaking by analyzing the last Olympics. The London Olympics generated several controversies, including badminton and soccer teams trying to lose or draw to set up more favorable seeding in the next round and a swimmer who admitted to taking illegal, extra kicks in his gold medal race. According to Klein, the fact that some people are “athletically excellent does not mean they are also morally excellent.” Read the full blog post.

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The Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy
This article by Professor Noel D. Campbell introduces the Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, launched in 2012. According to the abstract, “JEPP was created to encourage and disseminate quality research about the vital relationships among institutions, entrepreneurship and economic outcomes.” The latest issue covers such topics as creative destruction and entrepreneurship across disciplines.

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Public Policy, Objectivism, and Entrepreneurship
Stephen Hicks gave a talk on Public Policy, Objectivism, and Entrepreneurship at the 2012 Atlas Summit in Washington, DC. Some of his themes included: Our schizophrenic public policy culture — health, sex, religion, money; what wealth is; entrepreneurism as a cultural asset; Objectivism’s entrepreneurial ethic; and principled strategy in a mixed economy. Hicks will be speaking again at the 2013 Atlas Summit.

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Shawn Klein’s New Sports Ethicist Radio Program
The Sports Ethicist Show premiered on Rockford University Radio this week. Each week Klein and guests will discuss ethical and philosophical issues that arise in and around sport. The first episode on “What is Sport?” featured Professor Michael Perry. Listen to or download the podcast.

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Can Aerobic Activity Improve Executive Function?
Among other things, executive brain function helps us to plan, organize, and formulate strategies. Is it possible to improve this all-important brain function? A study from the Psychonomic Bulletin and Review gives evidence that aerobic activity can do just that. Read more about the study.

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See you next week!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

Philosophy and Film Series: Groundhog Day

Tuesday, January 29th, 2013

The Philosophy and Film Series presents a discussion of the 1993 film Groundhog Day.

Join Professors Matt Flamm and Shawn Klein on February 4th, from 4 to 5pm in the CEE office (on the 2nd floor of Burpee, to the right of the cafeteria entrance).

Light refreshments will be provided. All members of the campus community may attend.

Spring Semester CEE News

Thursday, January 24th, 2013

The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship has started another busy semester! Here is an update on some of our activities since the start of the new year:

We have our first Guest Speaker of the semester, Professor Arielle John, visiting next week (more details Monday).

Professor Shawn Klein has provided his thoughts on sports ethics and the Lance Armstrong confession to various media outlets, including CNN, Coach and Athletic Director Magazine, WREX 13 News, and CKNW Morning News (Search January 18 on the 6 a.m. hour; Dr. Klein’s segments are around the 10 minute and 20 minute marks).

Professor Stephen Hicks gave lectures in Porto Alegre, Brazil, Panama City, Panama, and Houston, Texas, was interviewed for the Cosmoetica blog, and appeared on David Hutzelman’s Public Affairs Public Access TV program (The full interview video is embedded below).

Shawn Klein to be Featured on WREX 13 News

Thursday, January 17th, 2013

Channel 13 News came by the CEE office today to interview Dr. Shawn Klein about sports ethics and Lance Armstrong’s use of performance enhancing drugs. Watch WREX Morning News (January 18) or check out their video page if you missed it.

A short article about the interview was posted here.

Check the Sports Ethicist blog for further updates.

Shawn Klein on Lance Armstrong’s Doping Confession

Thursday, January 17th, 2013

Lance Armstrong’s much-publicized interview with Oprah, in which he reportedly confesses to using performance enhancing drugs, will air tonight (January 17, 9pm ET, OWN). CNN asked columnists, authors, and sportswriters whether we should “give Lance another chance.” CEE professor Shawn Klein was among the responses CNN published. Dr. Klein wrote:

“After years of adamant denials and protestations of his innocence, Lance Armstrong has reportedly come forward to admit his use of prohibited performance enhancing drugs. If Armstrong is sincerely contrite and forthright in his apology, most people, including myself, will forgive him for his use of prohibited drugs.

He cheated in a sport known for its widespread cheating; that doesn’t justify his use but it does put his actions into an understandable context that makes it easier to excuse the use. Further, if Armstrong cooperates with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, his lifetime ban from cycling ought to be reduced to something more reasonable.

The more troubling aspects of the Armstrong case are the allegations that he harassed and intimidated team members and potential whistle-blowers. Violating the arbitrary rules of a sport shows a character flaw and poor judgment, but it is hard to see who else is truly harmed by such actions. But to threaten, intimidate and coerce others (either to use performance enhancing drugs themselves or to cover up his team’s use) causes real harm.

Even if only some of these reports are accurate, Armstrong will have to do more than sit on Oprah’s couch to earn forgiveness.”

Read more opinions on Armstrong’s confession here.

Related: Shawn Klein on the arguments against the use of performance enhancing technologies.