Posts Tagged ‘Entrepreneurship’

Interview with Roberto Salinas-León on Entrepreneurship in Mexico

Thursday, September 28th, 2017

[This is the full interview with Roberto Salinas-León which was published in our Kaizen newsletter.]

Roberto Salinas-León on Entrepreneurship in Mexico

Kaizen: To start, tell us about your schooling, please. Did you grow up in Mexico City?

Roberto Salinas-León: Yes, in Mexico City. I went to high school here and studied under a British system at a school called Green Gates, which still exists. It’s a very fine school.

Kaizen: What do you mean by the British system?

Salinas-León: Very challenging from an academic standpoint, with great teachers. O-levels and A-levels. When I graduated I was uncertain as to what I wanted to do. In my junior year my father interested me in the philosophy of freedom. The first book he gave me was The Epistemological Problems of Economics by Ludwig von Mises, and to this day I have yet to understand most of it.

Kaizen: Is there a business background in your family?

Salinas-León: Strong business background. We’re from Monterrey originally. My grandfather became a very important figure in Mexican business. He was basically the man who introduced popular retail here in Mexico through a chain store called Salinas y Rocha, with the Salinas and Rocha families.

He also happened to be interested in Austrian economics and philosophy, and he financed a center that was copied straight from Leonard Read’s Foundation for Economic Education. My father also became involved, as did my uncle, and they were able to discover an intellectual called Agustin Navarro Vasquez who was the equivalent of Manuel Ayau from Guatemala. He was close friends with Manuel Ayau and had the dream of establishing a university of freedom here in Mexico.

He was a very brave man—he ran a series of almost-secret seminars, because it was very unpopular in the late 70s and early 80s to be talking about these ideas when the banks were nationalized.

Kaizen: How repressed was the political environment then?

Salinas-León: It was the perfect dictatorship, because it was repression without seeming to be so—an indirect and sophisticated form of repression. If you said anything against the president or something they didn’t like, it could be anything from a tax audit—to being kidnapped for three days without knowing why—to outright violence.

Kaizen: So the political “Keep quiet” message would be sent.

You said your family was originally in Monterrey but you’re now located in Mexico City.

Salinas-León: My grandfather came to close one of the stores that was not doing well in Mexico City. Instead of closing it, he started opening a bunch more. He had  an out-of-the-box entrepreneurial spirit. Like I said, the idea of selling household goods to the popular levels of society seemed counterintuitive, but he was able to discover an important niche.

Kaizen: Let’s return to you. As a teenager, you had come from a family that was very intellectual and had a business background as well. Was your idea to go into the business?

Salinas-León: I had no idea. Originally I wanted to study Geography or History. My education was then geared toward the liberal arts. I didn’t want to leave Mexico, but I also wanted to enjoy the opportunities the USA afforded, or perhaps stay one more year and apply to a university in Britain. I didn’t do badly in my advanced level examinations.

I ended up applying only to two places, one of them because of my father’s  insistence. One was Hillsdale College in Michigan and the other was Colorado College in Boulder, and I got accepted to both. I wanted to go to Colorado, which was an outstanding school. My father wanted me to go to Hillsdale. He said to give Hillsdale one year, and if you don’t like it you can go to Colorado or come back to Mexico.

So I went to Hillsdale in 1979, wanting to study Austrian economics and political economy. Actually at that time Hillsdale was going through a slump in the economics department. A lot of turnaround but the lecture series was unbelievable. The only time I ever heard Tom Sowell speak was at Hillsdale. I was two weeks into my freshman year when I heard Bill Buckley debate Jesse Jackson on the Palestinian issue.

Kaizen: Wow, so it was a happening place in many respects.

Salinas-León: Oh my goodness. I got to see and meet Leonard Read. I stayed at Hillsdale not because of the Economics program but because their liberal arts program back then was spectacular. Their History program and Political Science program was taught by former students of Leo Strauss, so we learned politics through literature. Instead of James Q. Wilson’s American Government it was reading Shakespeare and Plato at the freshman level. Very challenging. And of course the teacher-to-student ratio was terrific. I was very much into studying and academic performance.

By my sophomore year the cultural shock had waned, and I became very fond of the institution. In my junior year I applied to the Washington Hillsdale Internship program. So in the winter of 1982 I went to work in Washington for six months as a part of my college credit with none other than Ron Paul, who back then was a freshman congressman. I met Rand Paul when he was just a teenager. It was a small office so it was terrific. I met Roger Ream, who was my actual boss. And I remember listening to Ron Paul having conversation with Friedrich Hayek and Henry Hazlitt and with the people at FEE. And for me this was a tremendous eye-opener.

This was the time of the Gold Commission in Washington, so I got to meet people involved in monetary policy when the Cato Institute first started its monetary policy seminars. It was an unbelievable experience to become involved with all of these institutions and the networking. This was during the Reagan years, which was a very exciting time to be in Washington. And I graduated in 1983.

Kaizen: So you had a solid liberal arts background, but you kept up your interest in monetary economics and broader economic policy?

Salinas-León: It was a degree in Political Economy and History. In my senior year I became very involved in Philosophy. I had the benefit of having a very good teacher.

Kaizen: You got your Ph.D. in Philosophy from Purdue University, Indiana.

Salinas-León: That was also an unusual episode. I wanted to go to law school, but I was never good at standardized testing. And despite having an excellent academic record, some of my targets did not accept me or put me on a waiting list. I thought I would give myself a chance since I was already involved in Philosophy. I got a scholarship at Vanderbilt and a scholarship at Purdue, which had a very unusual faculty. Purdue also had the benefit of being close to Hillsdale. I thought I would be able to still come back and forth during the weekends, but I later found out that was impossible with the academic load that they gave me.

Purdue then, and I believe still now, was a very unusual place because they had a young and upcoming faculty and they had outstanding Analytical philosophers and outstanding Continental philosophers. And the best part was that they actually got together. There was a camaraderie and a spirit of exchange. I ended up writing papers on Quine and Gadamer on the indeterminacy of translation. So it was a lovely place to be in. I had a professor that was a professed Sartraen Marxist, who gave a seminar on Rawls, Nozick, and Rorty. Rawls was accused of being a horrendous, ultra-right, capitalist pig, so I couldn’t imagine what I would do if I defended Mill  again. I just kept quiet. But people knew about my classical liberal background and my strong libertarian leanings back then, and I guess they were tolerated.

Purdue also had the great benefit that part of your training was not just to be a teaching assistant. After the first year, they assigned you an outright class. You were an instructor and part of the faculty, and you got paid as a part of the faculty as a graduate instructor. And my supervisors could walk into my class unannounced, so they kept us in check and I couldn’t just drivel my way out of a class.

Kaizen: So you were working hard on your teaching skills and getting a first-rate philosophy education?

Salinas-León: Yes. I had some phenomenal teachers.

Kaizen: Was your motivation just an interest in philosophy?

Salinas-León: I wanted to get a Masters and go back to law school. I was pursuing an interest. This was the time that Kripke had just shocked the world with Naming and Necessity, and there were these new theories and breakthroughs in semantics and philosophy of language. I became immersed and obsessed with these topics. And then later when I had to take Continental philosophy, my biases were quickly stripped away because I had such remarkable teachers who taught Heidegger and Sartre and Gadamer. And so it was a tremendous eye-opener. And I became obsessed with the topics. I wasn’t specializing though. I would go from one topic to another and sort of dance around. One semester it was the ontological arguments, another semester is was Rorty and Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature, and another semester it was postmodernism and its impact.

Kaizen: So you wound up getting a comprehensive education?

Salinas-León: It was like a liberal arts education. I applied to law school. I was accepted to Georgetown and George Mason, but I wanted to go to Texas because my family and my buddies were in Texas. After my Masters I was burned out. This was 1985.

Kaizen: So you had a Masters from Purdue at this point?

Salinas-León: Yes. At Purdue they were not happy that I had left. I went to law school in Texas. I was going to do one year at St. Mary’s Law School and then transfer to the University of Texas Law School, but my heart was not in it.

By a very unfortunate coincidence, this was the year of the Mexican earthquake in 1985. I went back home. I missed two weeks of law school, and I thought I might as well get my tuition back because there’s no way I was going to recover from missing two weeks. And so I took a year off and worked for my father. Purdue found out and called and said to come back. You’ll be 27 by the time you finish your Ph.D. You can still go to law school after that. I didn’t want to go back, and my parents actually sat me down and told me to go back and finish. And so I did, and again I did the same thing. I got involved in liberalism versus communitarianism, and I ended up staying only two years. I was offered an extra year, but by this time I was already published in journals.

Kaizen: What happens after the Ph.D.? Did you return to Mexico?

Salinas-León: When I finished I had not written my thesis, and I was offered another year to stay 1988-89 at Purdue and continue teaching. I would get help polishing some of my papers to try and get them published. I was given the red-carpet treatment.

At that time I was teaching critical thinking—basically logic—and the one class I had tremendous difficulty with was advanced symbolic logic. It’s curious that I had troubles taking the LSAT, and I wound up giving classes on how to take the LSAT because of the background in critical thinking. At that point I used to talk to my father about this idea that everyone would say there is nothing you can do with a Philosophy degree. Well, first of all, I would do what I wanted with it. I wanted to write papers on Kant and Hume and Rorty and naturalized epistemology or whatever. And I bet you that I could find a job in Mexico as a teacher in a Philosophy department.

And at that time Luis Pazos, probably the most important classical liberal in Mexico, had become a superstar because of his predictions about what would happen if you nationalized the banks and controlled the exchange rate and printed money. All of those catastrophes came true, and he became a source of wisdom. And he was an absolutely incredible communicator. He was the envy of many professional economists. The called him a supermarket economist because he is. That’s a title that I’m very honored to be known as. His retailing skills were amazing and still are. He had a think tank in Mexico, the Center for Free Enterprise Research, and he desperately needed someone to take the academic program and revamp and renew it and begin to do new things. So my grandfather and my father called me and asked me to come home. I hadn’t finished my thesis yet, but they said I should finish it in here in Mexico. So I went back just at the time that the Salinas de Gortari administration is coming into power, and instead of talking about nationalizing industries they were talking about privatizing industries. And instead of talking about regulating industries, they were talking about deregulation. And instead of protectionism, they were talking about NAFTA and free trade. I wasn’t prepared in economics at the time. I was a quick study, and I had to reread some of the stuff I read before and read all of the ideas on liberty and Friedman and all of the literature that was out there. But because the tide in Mexico turned, I quickly became very involved with the global think tank community—with the Universidad Francisco Marroquín, the Heritage Foundation in the United States, the Cato Institute, the American Enterprise Institute, and the Council for the Americas in New York.

But you won’t believe that what marked my difference was that I grew up bilingual. I was the only one at the institute with command of the English language. So NAFTA comes along and CNN and Time wanted interviews, and I was the guy. So my name started getting quoted in all these places, and I started getting all these interesting invitations to lecture in Dallas and Washington. It was a steep learning curve. With Cato I developed a phenomenal relationship with my dear friend Ed Crane, who has been an unbelievable supporter throughout the years. When Ian Vasquez came to work at the Cato Institute his very first job was to coordinate a massive conference that Cato and our center was putting together in Mexico City, and this was the last time Milton Friedman spoke in Mexico City. It was Friedman and fifty-three other outstanding scholars. The conference was called Liberty in the Americas.

Kaizen: What year was that?

Salinas-León: It was 1992. People still remember that conference.

Kaizen: So let’s pause at this moment. You had a number of strains in your upbringing and choices that you made that came together beautifully to position you for what you wound up doing after your Ph.D. What would you advise young people when they’re thinking about their education experience?

Salinas-León: I would strongly advise them not to predefine interests and to let the course of trial and error take place and learn what you like.

Kaizen: You gave us sort of a combination of advice from your parents, knowing people, following your own interests.

Salinas-León: It was very paternalistic advice. I didn’t have much choice. It was good advice, but if they were going to pay for it they wanted me to try what they wanted me to do for at least one year. And they were right. It was very good advice. But the reason for me going to Hillsdale was to learn Austrian Economics and the whole movement and the literature and what not. And actually what happened was that to me the great benefit of Hillsdale was that it had a very strong classical liberal arts program. At least two history professors were outstanding teachers. My English teacher, James King, is the best teacher I ever had.

Kaizen: The one who you learned Shakespeare from?

Salinas-León: Yes. That was the hardest class I ever took—and also the most fun class I ever took. An absolutely amazing intellectual experience. My philosophy professor was fabulous, an expert on the Parmenides of Plato. But the whole atmosphere was great. Even our accounting teacher was not mechanical. It was fun. I was very lucky to have these phenomenal teachers, and I was a very devoted student.

So my recommendation would be to try to broaden your horizons. If you want to be a doctor or a lawyer or be a professional economist, schools are going to take notice more of your broad-based background than they are of pre-law or pre-med. Broaden your horizons as much as possible. And enjoy the college experience. That’s something that perhaps I didn’t do.

I very much believe in the ancient lore that sports is an important part of your education. I told my kids that they need to engage in a sport. That’s part of their formation and their discipline.

Kaizen: Our center’s emphasis is on entrepreneurship. Is it fair to say that your advice is to have students think of their education as entrepreneurs?

Salinas-León: I would say that to be a successful entrepreneur today, you do have to have a broad scope. I have a son studying entrepreneurial science at Babson, and his focus is on managerial accounting and operations management and financial accounting and foundations of entrepreneurial sciences.

But I’ve got to say that a course on Shakespeare’s political plays can also teach you a great deal. A course on the philosophy of Lao Tzu can also teach you a great deal. Learning how to read Hume, whether or not you are a sympathizer, can also teach you a great deal because it broadens your mind.

Today’s entrepreneurial spirit has to be very out of the box and innovative. Think of the impossible. Think of the heroes of today, whether it’s Steve Jobs and the magic he created, or Elon Musk wanting to travel to Mars and everyone laughing at him. Those are the people who today are changing the world. And that requires not just an open mind but also an understanding, in my opinion, of the nature of an open society.

For instance, when studying Karl Popper at first I was adamantly opposed to his approach of scientific methodology and whatnot, but his whole idea of falsifiability that he talks about in The Logic of Scientific Discovery fits with, let’s say, Google’s fail forward philosophy. Many people think of philosophy as something that’s abstract and that you’re in another world.

Kaizen: For Popper’s abstract theory of scientific methodology, how would you summarize the falsifiability point for students who haven’t read it and connect it to the fail-forward philosophy?

Salinas-León: Well, you have an idea and the first thing you have to do is to refute it. It’s not confirm, confirm, confirm. It’s refute, refute, refute. The more I refute it, the more I learn that there was something that was flawed in my original idea, and I begin to polish it. And I refute it again, and how does it resist refutation? A business model is very much based on that philosophy.

Kaizen: Going out of your way to find a problem or flaw or weakness.

Salinas-León: It’s a problem-finding spirit. It will enhance your credibility.

Kaizen: Is this just a heuristic issue? Because we tend to come up with an idea and tend to follow up with our own ideas and then put the blinders on.

Salinas-León: I don’t think it’s just a heuristic issue. It’s both heuristic and substantive.

Kaizen: Is it about the limitations of knowledge, the fact that we don’t know very much?

Salinas-León: You have to be very humble. One speech I greatly admire was given by J.K. Rowling as a commencement address at Harvard in 2008, just before the financial crisis. It was called The Fringe Benefits of Failure. It was about failure and imagination. I think that’s what defines not just the entrepreneurial spirit, but a good part of the core of classical liberal philosophy: learning how to listen, keeping an open mind despite the idiocies and fallacies that surround us and day by day having to refute them and repeat the same old things over again—things that household mothers know better than any Ph.D. from MIT about the benefits of fiscal discipline and stability.

Kaizen: In formal education you unlearn some very good lessons.

Salinas-León: Yes, unfortunately, sometimes that happens. It’s the Keynesian pretense or the pretense of knowledge. I think Hayek’s Nobel lecture is one of the most magnificent pieces of classical liberal thought. Despite the zealotry of his other writings, I think he really caught onto something important that many classical liberals have underappreciated—the importance of a spontaneous order, little bits of knowledge lying all over the place and how they coordinate themselves. Sure you need the institutions and sure you may need the occasional helping hand and it’s good to have those debates, but the fact that there is no single mind that can amass all those bits of knowledge. I think the fatal conceit perhaps comes as too generous a characterization of that phenomenon that is so common in our politicians, whether it be Obamacare or our finance minister here in Mexico or Hugo Chavez who thinks he can erase history and start anew.

Kaizen: This highlights a difference between the way business leaders and political leaders run their organizations. Do you think it’s primarily a pretense of knowledge or a desire to control? Because if you want to control people you might pretend you know more than you do, or it might be that you actually think you do know and reluctantly think that you need to be in control.

Salinas-León: The character of a very successful businessman or businesswoman is difficult to appreciate. I think it’s a curious sociological phenomenon. Clearly you cannot contest their success. Despite the fact here in Mexico that Carlos Slim has been accused of running a monopoly, you have to appreciate his entrepreneurial genius. And he responded beautifully to incentives. The incentives of a fragile institutional framework were there, and he took advantage of them. So yeah it’s his fault, but it’s also the fault of our institutions. There’s a vicious circle here. But that doesn’t mean that being successful as a businessman or businesswoman entitles you to be the source of all wisdom and truth.

I’ve noticed this other sociological phenomenon in business leaders, and Donald Trump is the perfect example of this. All of a sudden they can talk about trade or the balance of payments or fiscal policy or even how to interpret Heidegger. There is a very strong element of hubris. You see this in Davos every year. It’s so pretentious.

Kaizen: The fatal conceit.

Salinas-León: That is the fatal conceit. You see these programs and they’re so pretentious. “We’re also experts in music and in the philosophy of life and how to take a yoga class.” Come on. The original was a semi-off-the-record exchange between leaders to contemplate what happens with the world and how we move forward.

Kaizen: What kind of conceit is it? Do you think it’s a pretense or genuinely held?

Salinas-León: Maybe a combination of the two. I think some people really believe it. Curiously enough, and you won’t believe this, but one person who denounced this was Paul Krugman. He wrote a book called Pop Internationalism before he became famous, a rock star, and was given a Nobel laureate for something he preaches against today. But in that book he even tells us that the end of trade is to import, not to export. So this whole nonsense with competitiveness he calls a dangerous obsession. And I completely agree with that. He even cited Frédéric Bastiat. If you really want to export the hell out of your nation, the easiest thing to do would be to generate a huge depression, and he has an article where he says that it’s a sorry state of affairs that businessmen think that because they can read a balance sheet, that means that entitles them to read a balance of payments or national income.

So many, like Trump today, tell us that America has a trade deficit and that’s automatically bad. Krugman himself plays with a nice idea. New York city imports everything and exports what? Entertainment, tourism, and financial services, for the sake of argument. That’s what New York does. Because of its special circumstances as a global city, if we take it out of the calculation of the balance of payments, our macroeconomics would look beautiful. People would feel a lot better even though nothing changes in the real economy. People would continue to trade the way they do every single day. I thought that was a very insightful example of how to demonstrate the miserable understanding that some business leaders show in terms of economics.

Kaizen: Even more so the politicians.

Salinas-León: Yes. And that’s not pretense. That can be genuine hubris. Even some free-market economists, Chicago trained or MIT trained. And I’m not an economist, but I do a lot of economic policy. Most people think I’m an economist here in Mexico. But in exchanges or debates I’ve been told that you can’t speak of this because you’re not an economist. My response is that I was a logic professor, and if you took a 101 logic class with me you’d get a zero for such a blatant ad hominem fallacy. Credentialism is the cheapest way to win an argument. And there’s a lot of credentialism among economists.

Kaizen: Let’s go back to the pretense of knowledge and motivation. In many cases people who express an interest in politics, and they recognize that they don’t necessarily know much about science or economics and so forth, but what attracts them is the idea of being a politician, which for them means being in control of things that are important. Do you find this also in the business sector?

Salinas-León: Yes, it happens. It’s what you may can an imperial design, wanting to micromanage every part. My grandfather was a little bit like that.

Kaizen: But he had the entrepreneurial chops to back it up to a large extent it sounds like.

Salinas-León: He did. And you didn’t have the right to question him because of his success. But there are also many others, especially younger generations of entrepreneurs in Mexico, where some of the people in the states at local levels, you would marvel at what they were able to achieve.

I almost think that Leonard Read was wrong in describing I, Pencil as a miracle because of the spontaneous order. I, Pencil continues to survive in spite of the worst institutional settings. I wrote an article about this saying that I, Pencil continues to thrive despite our labor and tax laws and our regulations that were made to extort.

You practically cannot survive in the business world today without falling prey to some form of corruption. Corruption becomes the price you pay to simply get ahead. It’s a tax.

Kaizen: Let me use that to transition to the Mexico Business Forum. You were president of that organization. What’s its function?

Salinas-León: The Mexico Business Forum was part of the Economist corporate network.

Kaizen: This is affiliated with the magazine?

Salinas-León: Yes, and the Economist Intelligence Union. I worked very closely with the Economist Intelligence Union. For thirteen years I ran their conference program here in Mexico. And the vehicle through which I ran it was the Mexico Business Forum. The corporate network before had the Estonia Business Forum, the Argentina Business Forum, and the Brazil Business Forum. In Latin America they all started dying down for different reasons. The business model was outdated. It was sort of like a corporate club. I was in television at the time doing a lot of media journalism. What I tried to do was use, let’s say, a powerful brand to open doors and plant the seed of classical liberal ideas all over the place. With the conferences we held, the president always came and the finance minister and central bank governor and all the business leaders. We got a tremendous amount of exposure. I had a chance to develop a session on simple rules for a complex world and a session on the benefits of free exchange.

Kaizen: So a certain amount of a healthy business culture has to do with political economy. It sounds like a large part of what you were doing was political economy.

Salinas-León: Back then it was political economy. Later I left the Economist. I got tired, basically.

Kaizen: So part of it is working toward a healthy political and economic environment.

Salinas-León: That was the idea, to basically use this as a vehicle to transmit ideas that would consolidate or fortify messages and themes that we wanted to permeate policy action, whether it was a flat tax being a good idea or a sound currency or central bank independence or a flexible or fixed exchange rates. We had these healthy debates and a tremendous amount of exposure.

Now, a lot of people mistakenly think that if you’re an economist that you’re a financial analyst. That’s one of the great fallacies. Many economists should learn a lot more about what traders actually do, and traders should learn more about economics. But I quietly started getting into being an investment advisor, and I found that I had a certain knack for it, especially in putting together the right team and dealing with the deal breakers. And you know what, that comes from philosophical training.  And today eight percent of my time is devoted to that. My policy and my engagement in the Association of Private Enterprise and Education and Liberty Fund and so on are very good public relations vehicles to be able to expand business opportunities. I’ve had to be a quick study and learn about finance and corporate law and tax law.

Kaizen: So you’re a Renaissance man.

Salinas-León: I don’t pretend to be, but it’s been fun. Some operations have been very successful, and some have been a disaster. There is a very steep learning curve. I can’t think that because the first three or four things I did were successful that everything I would do would turn into gold. The lesson in humility was strong, and it was not intellectual. It was financial. Ouch. You have to be a quick study.

Kaizen: So you go from high philosophical and political and economic theory to dealing with political and economic infrastructure in Mexico and abroad and then down to particular high-level financial investments, and so on.

What about grassroots entrepreneurship? Does the Business Forum talk about developing the entrepreneurial culture?

Salinas-León: Very much so. We talked about this much more in the past, especially the small-sized entrepreneur. One project I have for the future is to develop a whole series of cases and show anecdotally, not with a big theorem or whatever, why Mexico does not grow at the rate that it has the capacity to do so. We are a country that should be growing at seven or eight or nine percent a year on a sustained basis. We have that potential.

So part of the vitriol that we get from Trump and his supporters today is probably a little deserved because we haven’t done the full homework and we haven’t gone full circle. We started a program of structural reforms, but we didn’t do the second wave of reforms. You need to go back to the local property registry and make sure those titles are clear and easily available, because that’s what makes the difference between trading your property and not being able to trade it or it being caught in legal limbo.

So a deep capital market very much depends on the transparency and the reliability of your institutional framework that is governing. With banks today that is happening. Why? Because we’ve imported our laws. It’s an international banking system. We have HSBC, and this beautiful new building we’re in right now is a Spanish bank. It’s not a Mexican bank.

Kaizen: So you’re importing everything, but what about the homegrown?

Salinas-León: The homegrown still needs a lot of work. It’s gotten better, but in some places its gotten worse. I believe that Hernando de Soto with his work touched the tip of the iceberg of a much deeper and pervasive phenomenon in Mexico and in Latin America. I worked with him on the project that he launched here in Mexico ten years ago. Many of the young men and women here that go out into the streets and sell you entertainment, or if it’s raining sell you an umbrella, or if it’s September, the month that we celebrate our independence, they’ll sell you flags. Right now it’s Halloween so they’ll sell you masks of Donald Trump or Dracula or Batman or whatever. They’re extremely innovative and inventive, and they do it at the margin of the law. Even cars that park here and sell taquitos and cerveza, and in instead of going to the Four Seasons restaurant you want to come here and have a beer and a paper plate of taquitos.

But those people need light and water and police protection. The police protect them. The agent from the federal electricity commission will come and illegally make sure they have the electricity that they need. And, of course, everything is based on bribing those people. What are you doing? You’re taxing. And it’s an efficient form of taxing because you are getting the service that you’re expecting.

Now, the tragedy of an informal economy is that it’s incredibly innovative and has a tremendous entrepreneurial spirit, but it’s necessarily local. It will never expand from that immediate universe. You can’t capture economies of scale. And if you get into a dispute, you can’t have access to contracts or to the legal system. You’re always going to remain in that circle. There’s a real need, as Hume would say, for a system of justice.

Kaizen: So you say the entrepreneurial spirit and the ingenuity and the energy is there at the grassroots level, but what you need is reforms at the local political level—access to the legal system, accesses to the utilities.

Salinas-León: Something as simple as, for instance, why are the 3,800 local municipalities in Mexico the ones that have the right to issue construction permits? That’s become a medium of extortion. All of the stories that you’ve heard about Wal-Mart engaging in bribes here in Mexico are absolutely true. And it wasn’t just one, it was every single one of them. Otherwise you cannot get ahead. It’s pervasive.

Kaizen: It’s systemic corruption at the local level.

Salinas-León: It’s systemic. Construction permits should be issued by an independent and credible decentralized or non-profit organization with very specific tracking mechanisms. I know in the United States there are cities in Georgia today where you can go online and track permits like you can track a package being shipped. We need that technology in Mexico. And that’s just one example of countless examples.

There’s this program in the United States called American Horror Story. One day I’d like to publish Mexican Horror Story. And I can tell you from a real life point of view that I’ve been a victim of this in my business engagements. Time and time again the number one problem is the regulatory exchange with the powers that be.

Today I’m trying to broker deals with people wanting to come into the energy sector in Mexico because of the very ambitious, market-oriented transformation opening of the energy sector at long last. It will take many years, but the number one problem whether it’s a fund or a company or group of investors is the regulatory environment. They’re sick of it. They’re absolutely sick of it. You need to hire a first-class lawyer or somebody who is respected as a godfather-like figure that you won’t want to mess with. And, of course, he or she will charge you a large amount. That transaction cost inhibits Mexican growth.

Kaizen: It’s a lot higher than in places that have cleaned up the corruption.

Salinas-León: Like Chile, for instance.

KaizenOr Uruguay.

Salinas-León: Or Uruguay.

Argentina is another sad case in point. A friend of mine used to be the representative of a company that sells billboard advertisement. He would say that it’s amazing that there’s nothing that can get done here without a kickback or a bribe.

Kaizen: This is in Argentina?

Salinas-León: No, here in Mexico. And then he goes and lives in Argentina and he says that it’s worse here. It’s almost like it’s permeated in the system. So one policy challenge is: How do you get rid of that corruption? It’s not by pointing the finger.

Kaizen: You need case studies about how other countries have dealt with this.

Salinas-León: Not case studies but anecdotal examples. It’s happened to me, and I’d like to describe it.

Kaizen: So corruption certainly is an issue, and the regulatory environment goes hand in hand.

About Mexico’s ties to the United States: From our perspective we get a lot of entrepreneurial Mexicans who are ambitious and work hard and have good ideas. From the Mexican perspective, is that a brain drain problem?

Salinas-León: No question about it. A former partner of mine and former candidate to the presidency, Josefina Vásquez Mota, recently published twenty-four interviews with Mexicans who have crossed the border. It’s something similar to what I’d like to do with my Mexican horror stories, but hers are more positive.

Despite the odds and the hostilities and having to cross the border illegally and swim across the river and having to go through the coyote industry, which is extremely dangerous like the mafia that cross you over the border. You have the danger of suffocating in the 120-degree heat in the Arizona desert because you’re left alone inside of a truck when the coyote escapes to save his own skin. Despite all of this, there are these case studies of twenty-four Mexicans, and what would you want? You would want those people back home.

One of them took himself and the lore of his mother and grandmother’s recipes into the United States and he ended up in Chicago. I forget the details of the story, but he started off as a dishwasher. Chicago has a huge Mexican population.  Mexico City and then L.A. and then Guadalajara, and then the fourth largest Mexican populated city is Chicago. So he started off as a dishwasher and later on became a cook and discovered he has a flare for it. Years later he gets a group of investors and starts his own restaurant called Mexique, and it’s the only Mexican restaurant in the world with a one-star Michelin.

Kaizen: Wow. Nice.

Salinas-León: We have restaurants here that have one or two stars in Mexico City, but they’re not necessarily Mexican. This is the only Mexican restaurant with a Michelin star.

Another example is a man they call Dr. Q. He was basically a tomato picker who went from Mexico where he picked tomatoes to California where he picked tomatoes. Turns out that this man had an enormous knowledge of neuroscience and medicine, and today he is a globally famous expert at a hospital in San Diego where those same hands that used to pick tomatoes are now going into brains to operate and take out cancer.

Tell me, do I want that human capital in my country? We don’t need a wall. We need incentives to bring them back.

Kaizen: So the incentives go the other way. We get many of the best Mexicans.

Salinas-León: You go to New York on lower Park Avenue where a lot of the big banks are and a lot of the up and coming bankers there are Mexicans—extremely well trained, extremely hard working.

Kaizen: So they need the incentives to come back to Mexico or to not leave in the first place. That’s going to mean less crime, less corruption, and a healthier regulatory environment.

Salinas-León: Yes. I would emphasize a healthier regulatory environment. What we call derecho facilitador, derecho as in law. We need a more facilitating environment.

I love Richard Epstein’s Simple Rules for a Complex World. I think he hit it right on the mark. We tend to think of very complicated rules to try and make our lives more simple. That’s the hubris of a politician or an economist who wants to mold you and determine the future in accordance with the law. All you do is you end up making our lives miserable.

Now, crime is a different phenomenon. It definitely affects business decisions. A dear friend of mine has been very successful exploiting trade between Mexico and Canada, which by the way has gone up exponentially in the past twenty years. Canadians don’t know it, but the mangos and the flowers they buy come from ranches in Mexico. My friend has gone to all theses states that have basically been abandoned by the federal government and are fragile and have been taken over by either the cartels or by paramilitary groups that devote their lives to extorting you. Of course, all the municipal president does is steal the money from the coffers or use the permits to extort you, so their popularity is not great. So these people think of themselves as Robin Hoods.

Now, they come and they tax my friend. That’s money that could have been used for other things, but you know what, he’s still prosperous. That’s what’s so amazing about these stories. These people are still able to find a way to get ahead. At the end of the day it’s real cost reduction. You need entrepreneurial inventiveness and new technology for real cost reduction, but you also need the help of the government for real cost reduction. These people are able to do real cost reduction and remain competitive despite the setbacks of a very fragile and sometimes nonexistent institutional framework.

Kaizen: You talked about Mexicans going to the United States and Canada for business opportunities. What about business opportunities for young American and Canadian entrepreneurs coming to Mexico looking for opportunities? Do you recommend finding a local partner?

Salinas-León: Most definitely. I would say two things. Don’t listen to what you hear, and study the facts. Mexico is the second largest trading partner of the United States. Mexico is the number one supplier of auto parts to the United States in the world. Mexico trades more with the United States than Germany, Britain, and Japan put together. You can’t treat your second largest trading partner the way that Donald Trump wants to treat us. That’s just bad business. Probably the NFL would have to be abolished because NFL helmets are produced here in Mexico.

And instead of thinking of North America as three different countries, think of it as one integrated zone. That’s what NAFTA was supposed to be like. We could have an integrated energy corridor that today could supply the rest of the world energy for the next 150 years. Mexico is not just in oil. We have vast potential in shale gas. We don’t have the technology and we don’t have the resources and investment, but at least now we have the open regime that can invite that type of investment. Ford has this remarkable establishment in Mexico, one of the best Ford plants in the world. They depend on the intellectual knowledge that they get from Detroit and even from Windsor, Canada, so it’s going to affect the entire supply chain. You’re going to kill the entire supply chain.

So that mentality of integration eventually has to expand to all factors of production. It would be much more intelligent than calling us rapists and wanting to build a wall to think of a legal framework and forge cultural partnerships. We need leadership for that.

Now, you need to understand that there is this very close tie between the United States and Mexico vis-à-vis trade. It’s a vast amount of trade. Mexico exports one billion dollars of manufactured goods to the United States per day.  That’s more than China. And that involves a lot of transportation. So instead of having all of these bottlenecks at the border we should be thinking of bridges and technologies that could supervise and track the trucks and whether they are misbehaving or not.

Kaizen: So, in addition to all the market entrepreneurs, we need some healthy political entrepreneurs.

Salinas-León: Leadership and political entrepreneurs, but it’s difficult in this political environment.

If you want to come to Mexico, there are wonderful opportunities. There are opportunities in the service sectors, in technology, and tremendous opportunities in retail. The purchasing power here because of the stabilization of the currency is far better than it used to be. There’s been a decoupling of the exchange rate and the inflation rate, so despite volatility to the exchange rate people here still command very much of a dollar mentality.

But in some of the business ventures that I’ve done, I’ve known some very smart people who have come into Mexico without a local partner. That is a potential for suicide. I know of some of these horror stories where someone comes in and buys a lot of land and wants to develop it. It turns out that the same notary public that notarized that land in your name also notarized it in the name of his compadre. And his compadre is the compadre of the local state judge. So unless you have a local partner that can strong arm and get you out of messes like that, you’re going to lose.

Kaizen: So don’t be an idiot.

Salinas-León: It’s very unfortunate that in Mexico you have to do that, but you do need a strong advisor and especially a strong local partner.

Kaizen: So the transaction costs are going to be higher than you think.

Salinas-León: They could. You’re running an unnecessary risk. So why not share the wealth with your local partner? You can still retain a majority but you have someone here with the skills and the PR network. We call it the tropicalization of your business model because it really is a jungle. You need to know the ins and outs.

Kaizen: So you need the local knowledge.

Salinas-León: The local knowledge.

Kaizen: To bring things to a close, you’ve been working in the intellectual world, business world, and political world for many years now. Is there anything that has really stuck with you from your education time? Is there a lesson that you learned that has been useful to you over the course of the years?

Salinas-León: I guess I would come back to first principles. The mental clarity about economic principles, for instance, has been incredibly useful. Excuse my French, but it really sharpens your nose for bullshit, and you can detect immediately if this is wrong or right. Sticking to first principles, but not because I know more than everyone else. On the contrary.

Kaizen: It keeps you reality oriented.

Salinas-León: I like to say that taxi drivers, housemothers, and people from the informal economy know more about economics than the most highbrow, enlightened bureaucrat.

Kaizen:  In most cases it’s tacit for them.

Salinas-León: In most cases it is tacit but it is very responsive. It’s almost automatic. So that’s one. And then the value of trial and error and with it learning the limits of knowledge. And humility doesn’t mean silence. You can be very active and very engaged, but learning how to listen is key.

And I would say this to some of my dear classical liberal friends as well that sometimes do not want to listen to other points of view because it’s not 100% Austrian or 100% Chicago. Learn to listen to other disciplines, and recognize the fact that we don’t have a monopoly on truth. My father and I used to talk about this day in and day out. It was a common theme and not just a theme in academia or the policy world, but a theme in the real world as well.

This interview was conducted for Kaizen by Stephen Hicks.

William Kline on entrepreneurship and liberty

Friday, November 20th, 2015

University of Illinois, Springfield Professor William Kline’s 14-minute video lecture on “Entrepreneurship and Liberty.” Professor Kline discusses the relationship between liberty and entrepreneurship. He explains how laws, culture, and economic regulation can infringe upon the freedom of entrepreneurs and inhibit their abilities to be innovative. He stresses the importance of economic liberty in particular in providing the right environment for entrepreneurship to flourish.

Professor Kline’s lecture is part of the ongoing Entrepreneurship and Values series, recorded and produced by the Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship. Other lecturers in the six-part series include Alexei Marcoux, Stephen Hicks, Terry Noel, and Robert Salvino.

Robert Salvino on entrepreneurship and public policy

Friday, November 6th, 2015

Coastal Carolina University Professor Robert Salvino’s 15-minute video lecture on “Entrepreneurship and Public Policy.” Professor Salvino discusses public policy and its effect on entrepreneurship. He contrasts active public policy methods (e.g., subsidies) and passive public policy methods (e.g., lowering taxes) and hypothesizes that passive approaches to public policy often result in more innovation and entrepreneurship.

Professor Salvino’s lecture is part of the ongoing Entrepreneurship and Values series, recorded and produced by the Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship. Other lecturers in the six-part series include Alexei Marcoux, Stephen Hicks, William Kline, and Terry Noel.

The Capitalist Heart Surgeon, Silicon Valley’s Start-up Machine, Advice for Success, Censorship and Business, Hicks on Poverty to Prosperity, Defining Competition

Friday, August 9th, 2013

KWR title- 19
Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

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The Capitalist Heart Surgeon
Dr.-Devi-ShettyDubbed “India’s Walmart of Heart Surgery,” Devi Shetty is a heart surgeon-turned-businessman who has cut the cost of heart surgery by 98 percent to just US$1,555. The same procedure costs US$106,385 at Ohio’s Cleveland Clinic. This article explains that Shetty keeps the costs low in his 21 medical centers by buying cheaper scrubs, using air conditioning only in the most essential rooms, and through other efficiencies..
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Silicon Valley’s Start-up Machine
silicon-valleys-most-important-startup-factory-y-combinator-is-shrinkingY Combinator is an organization founded by Paul Graham that accelerates the early phases for start-ups. Its first graduating class in 2005 included Reddit, Infogami, Dropbox, Airbnb, and Stripe. Y Combinator holds two three-month sessions every year. During that time, start-up founders receive mentoring at regular meetings with each of Y Combinator’s partners. Read more.

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Censorship Inhibiting Entrepreneurship in Quebec
censorshipAccording to the province of Quebec’s censors, “Wellarc” is too English to be used as a business name. The entrepreneur who proposed the name is Xavier Menard, a 17 year old from Quebec. Menard is up against Quebec’s Bill 101, which requires that businesses in Quebec have French names and signs. According to this article, Menard responded to the government with a video in which he argues that it doesn’t make sense to limit the choices of Quebec businesses when the province has a high unemployment rate..
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Essential Advice for Success
bob-lefsetzAccording to Bob Lefsetz, embracing individuality is an essential cornerstone to success. Other factors include: the personal touch, quality over quantity, and understanding that talent is not god-given. According to Lefstez, “None of us are perfect, we can all improve, we all make mistakes. But let me be clear, ignore the haters, ignore advice unless you’re asking for it.” Read the article..

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From Poverty to Prosperity
saupload_poverty_to_prosperityIn this post, Stephen Hicks enthusiastically reviews Arnold Kling and Nick Schulz’s From Poverty to Prosperity: Intangible Assets, Hidden Liabilities and the Lasting Triumph over Scarcity. Hicks likes the authors’ emphasis on the foundational economic role of entrepreneurs, their insistence upon the study of real human agents, and their assumption that “win-win social relations are normal and the proper benchmark, not the usual expectation of zero-sum.”.

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Defining Competition
sports ethicistAs part of a recent seminar, Shawn Klein (a.k.a. the Sports Ethicist), developed a genus-species definition of competition. What do competition in business and sports have in common? Is war properly described as a competition? Are two animals fighting over mates or food competing? Klein elaborates on why certain aspects of competition were rejected and others included. Read more.

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See you in two weeks!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.


Weighing Privacy Rights, Monsanto’s Seed Patents, Teen Innovators, Entrepreneurship for School Reform, The Crisis of Socialism, and Debating Hockey Fights

Friday, June 14th, 2013

KWR title15a
Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

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Do Privacy Rights Matter?
cellphonellAmericans have had a lot to digest lately. Not only was it reported that phone companies have been selling customers’ personal information to third parties, but Americans have also learned that their government has been tracking their metadata through their phones. Do Americans care? According to this summation of several surveys from the Electronic Privacy Information Center, “the importance of privacy has steadily trended upward over seven years.”.

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The Future is Bright: Amazing Teen Innovators
Teen-Phone Capacitor-2Worried about the ingenuity of our next generation? Consider this: An 18-year-old has developed a capacitor that charges cellphones in under 30 seconds. In the booming market of apps, a teen has contributed an emergency-notification app. One teen designed a low-cost, self-driving car. Another teen has created a single-person submarine. And this 15-year-old budding scientist has developed a fast, low-cost blood test to detect pancreatic cancer..

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Big Win for Monsanto’s Intellectual Property Rights
Monsanto Seeds 3Would innovation happen without intellectual property rights and the profit-motive? In a major win for intellectual property rights, the Supreme Court recently decided in Bowman v. Monsanto Co. that the farmer, Vernon Bowman, had infringed on Monsanto’s patent rights when he copied and used the seeds he yielded from a crop of Monsanto, patent-protected seeds. Read more about the case and decision.

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Is Entrepreneurship the Key to School Reform?
Student Voice Live 2At a recent event in New York, Dell and a student advocacy group, StudentVoice, hosted a day-long conference devoted to exploring ways schools can introduce entrepreneurship in the classroom. According to Zak Malamed, co-founder of StudentVoice, “Research shows that it’s entrepreneurial innovation that will lead to global economic recovery, and it’s important to nurture this entrepreneurial spirit from a young age.” Read more about the event and panelists.

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New Chapters from Audiobook Version of Explaining Postmodernism
explaining postmodernismTwo more chapters from Stephen Hicks’s Explaining Postmodernism audiobook have been released. Chapter Four takes an in-depth look at “The Climate of Collectivism” in nineteenth- and twentieth-century political thought, and Chapter Five explores how the “The Crisis of Socialism” led to Postmodernism.

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Five for Fighting: Is Hockey Fighting Justified?
sports ethicistFor many hockey fans, fights are a natural and enjoyable part of the game. But is the fighting justified? The Sports Ethicist, Shawn Klein, takes a look at the most common justifications for hockey fights. In his assessment, Klein opines that “it is a lack of sportsmanship and self-control, and overall does more harm to the sport than any purported benefits.”

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See you in two weeks!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

 


Dr. Stephen Hicks’s Recent Talk in Stockholm

Tuesday, May 28th, 2013

Steve atlasLast week, Hicks participated in a colloquium on “Virtues and Entrepreneurship,” organized by Sweden’s Ratio Institute. His talk was an extension of the theme of his “What Business Ethics Can Learn from Entrepreneurship,” arguing that the success traits of entrepreneurship map onto an updated Aristotelian virtue set. The conference included keynote speeches by Deirdre McCloskey, author of The Bourgeois Virtues, and Saras Sarasvathy, author of Effectual Entrepreneurship.

KWR: Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, The Discovery that Could Change the World, Crowdfunding Lessons, Regulating Entrepreneurship, Explaining Postmodernism

Friday, May 3rd, 2013

Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.

Editor: Virginia Murr

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Entrepreneurship and Public Policy
Guest speaker Dr. Robert Salvino recently spoke on “Entrepreneurship and Public Policy” at Rockford University. Salvino received his Ph.D. from Georgia State University in 2007 and currently teaches in the Department of Economics at Coastal Carolina University, South Carolina. In the video below, Salvino discusses highlights from his lecture.


This Scientific Discovery Could Change the World
Imagine giving your smart phone a long-lasting charge in just a couple seconds. Now imagine that this technology is scalable, which can lead to manufacturing and wide-scale technological implementation. Two scientists believe they have discovered a supercapacitor that can provide all of this and much more. Read more about the revolutionary supercapacitor “accidentally” discovered by chemist Richard Kaner and researcher Maher El-Kady.

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Regulations that Strike the Heart of Entrepreneurship
While undergoing cancer treatment, Lauren Boice learned how difficult it is to receive cosmetology services while home-bound. Determined to help others in her situation, Boice started a dispatch business to set up appointments for home-bound individuals with cosmetologists. According to the Arizona Board of Cosmetology, however, Boice was practicing cosmetology and needed a license as well as a brick and mortar store. Read attorney Timothy Sandefur’s comments on the case.

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Crowdfunding: Lessons for Entrepreneurs
Kauffman Dissertation Fellow Ethan Mollick examined almost 47,000 projects on Kickstarter and identified the factors that influence whether a project will succeed or not, such as having a strong geographic tie-in (e.g., pitching country music in Nashville, film in Los Angeles, etc.). Read the full article.

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Postmodernism versus Reason
Stephen Hicks has released two more chapters from his Explaining Postmodernism audiobook. Listen to Chapter Two: “The Counter-Enlightenment Attack on Reason” and Chapter Three: “The Twentieth-Century Collapse of Reason.”

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Join Us in Our Mission
The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship focuses on the ethical infrastructure of an entrepreneurial society, as we believe that this is necessary to human flourishing. Please join us by making a donation today through the PayPal link or send a check via snail-mail. Thank you for your support.

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See you next week!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

Professor Robert Salvino to Speak at Rockford University

Monday, April 22nd, 2013

On April 23, Robert Salvino will speak on the topic of “Entrepreneurship and Public Policy.” Dr. Salvino received his Ph.D. from Georgia State University in 2007 and currently teaches in the Department of Economics at Coastal Carolina University, South Carolina.

All of the campus community is welcome to attend. Scarborough Hall, Rm 212 from 11:00am – 12:15pm.

Kaizen Weekly Review

Friday, March 29th, 2013

Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

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Innovative Education: the Computer in the Wall
The winner of this year’s one million dollar TED prize and professor of educational technology at Newcastle University, Professor Sugata Mitra, set up a computer in a New Dehli slum, connected it to the internet, and placed it inside of a wall, protected only by a shield of plastic. After making the mouse accessible, he left. According to this Wired article, Mitra came back eight hours later and saw kids browsing the Internet in English, a language they do not speak.

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Should Olympic Athletes Be More Moral Than Other Athletes?
Professor Shawn Klein, a.k.a. The Sports Ethicist, discusses morality and rule-breaking by analyzing the last Olympics. The London Olympics generated several controversies, including badminton and soccer teams trying to lose or draw to set up more favorable seeding in the next round and a swimmer who admitted to taking illegal, extra kicks in his gold medal race. According to Klein, the fact that some people are “athletically excellent does not mean they are also morally excellent.” Read the full blog post.

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The Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy
This article by Professor Noel D. Campbell introduces the Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, launched in 2012. According to the abstract, “JEPP was created to encourage and disseminate quality research about the vital relationships among institutions, entrepreneurship and economic outcomes.” The latest issue covers such topics as creative destruction and entrepreneurship across disciplines.

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Public Policy, Objectivism, and Entrepreneurship
Stephen Hicks gave a talk on Public Policy, Objectivism, and Entrepreneurship at the 2012 Atlas Summit in Washington, DC. Some of his themes included: Our schizophrenic public policy culture — health, sex, religion, money; what wealth is; entrepreneurism as a cultural asset; Objectivism’s entrepreneurial ethic; and principled strategy in a mixed economy. Hicks will be speaking again at the 2013 Atlas Summit.

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Shawn Klein’s New Sports Ethicist Radio Program
The Sports Ethicist Show premiered on Rockford University Radio this week. Each week Klein and guests will discuss ethical and philosophical issues that arise in and around sport. The first episode on “What is Sport?” featured Professor Michael Perry. Listen to or download the podcast.

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Can Aerobic Activity Improve Executive Function?
Among other things, executive brain function helps us to plan, organize, and formulate strategies. Is it possible to improve this all-important brain function? A study from the Psychonomic Bulletin and Review gives evidence that aerobic activity can do just that. Read more about the study.

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See you next week!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

Soon Chilean Entrepreneurs Will Be Able to Incorporate in One Day

Thursday, February 7th, 2013

By May, a new law in Chile should be in effect, allowing entrepreneurs to incorporate their businesses online for free within one day. This is part of Chile’s Year of Innovation, a billion-dollar initiative launched by President Sebastián Piñera, which is designed to simplify the process of innovation for Chileans.

Read more about the new law here.

Learn about Chile’s Year of Innovation.