Archive for the ‘Sports Ethics’ Category

Sports entrepreneurship: Three interviews (Snider, Reinsdorf, Checketts)

Sunday, August 10th, 2014

Here are three of our Kaizen interviews on entrepreneurship and ethics in sports:

51546099 Ed Snider, owner of hockey’s Philadelphia Flyers and basketball’s Philadelphia 76ers: “I think when you’re young you’re a bigger risk-taker than when you’re older. And I think when you’re young it’s not the risk as much as it is you have this idea and you feel like it’s going to work. And then you go for it. When I was a kid I was always doing things—selling magazines, I had a paper route. In college I hired all of my fraternity brothers because I had these lots I could get Christmas trees or Easter flowers from. In those days all of the kids in the fraternities would go to work at the post-office for Christmas. So I’d hire them, I’d pay them more and say, ‘We’re going to have Christmas tree lots.’ Stuff like that—I was always looking to do something.”

Reinsdorf webJerry Reinsdorf, owner of basketball’s Chicago Bulls and baseball’s Chicago White Sox: “First of all, if you want to be successful, you have to follow basic business principles. The problem in sports that keeps people from doing it is that every move is chronicled by the media. There are so many people who own teams who are afraid to be criticized by the media, so they make stupid decisions just to make the media happy. I, on the other hand, delight in doing what the media doesn’t want me to do. And that’s not a good trait either. You have to make your decisions without regard to what the media thinks. Sometimes they’re right, and sometimes they’re wrong.”

Checketts webDavid Checketts, owner of soccer’s Real Salt Lake and hockey’s St. Louis Blues: “I live by a standard that Steve Covey taught me, which is that a person will do more with their bad idea than they will with your good idea. So I try to hire real capable, competent people, put them in place, make sure that they have the right incentives and motivation, and then give them the freedom to do the job. The skill that I had to learn was to hold them accountable, regardless of my personal feelings about them. Because I am somebody who builds friendships and relationships quickly and who really wants people to succeed. So it makes it hard. I stuck with some people too long in some instances.”

Klein interviewed for Wharton online journal

Friday, December 6th, 2013

Professor Shawn E. Klein was interviewed for an article in the online business journal of The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. The focus of the article is on the idea of buying “shares” in professional athletes.

“Fantex: Is Buying Shares in Athletes Risky Business?”.

Dr. Klein teaches philosophy at Rockford University, including Philosophy of Sport (PHIL 340) in Spring 2014. He blogs at SportsEthicist.com.

Sports Studies Symposium 2014 — Call for Abstracts

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

se-thumb-180Professors Shawn Klein and Michael Perry are organizing the Third Annual Rockford University Sports Studies Symposium, to be held in April 2014. The theme is “Defining Sport.”

Here is the full Call for Abstracts.

Professor Klein is also the Sports Ethicist — check out his podcast series at iTunes.

Shawn Klein on the Biogenesis Scandal

Thursday, October 24th, 2013

Biogenesis

At his blog, The Sports Ethicist, Dr. Shawn Klein explores the ethical issues at play in the recent Biogenesis performance-enhancing drug scandal in major league baseball. Dr. Klein’s post was later linked to by Sports Illustrated columnist Phil Taylor.

Kaizen Weekly Review

Friday, March 1st, 2013

Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor: Virginia Murr

The Last Mile May Be First Step for Inmate Entrepreneurs

At California’s San Quentin prison, inmates have the opportunity to participate in the Last Mile, an entrepreneurship course modeled on start-up incubators that take in batches of young companies and provide them with courses, informal advice, and seed investments. Start-up ideas from inmates include a cardiovascular health organization and an e-commerce site for artists in prison. Read the full article here.

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The Open Letter that Stopped a Lucrative Marketing Campaign

On September 19, 2012, Thor Halvorssen, Founder of the Human Rights Foundation, published this open letter to Urban Outfitters in The Huffington Post about its Che Guevara marketing campaign and line of fashion merchandise. The letter is useful as a case study for Business Ethics courses in discussions of marketing using popular political figures, especially those with a record like Guevara’s. Urban Outfitters subsequently decided to drop its Che campaign and fashion line.

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The Morality of Capitalism

Stephen Hicks gave a talk to the Bastiat Society in Panama on the debates over the morality of capitalism, contrasting the positions of Friedrich Hayek, Ayn Rand, Milton Friedman, and others. Here is the abstract from his lecture.

Note: The Bastiat Society is named for Frédéric Bastiat, the great nineteenth-century liberal public intellectual.

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.A Quirky Interview

In a recent interview with Dan Schneider for Cosmoetica, Hicks covered such themes as the nature of values, art, religion, corporations, and the meaning of life. Other interviewees in the series include Daniel Dennett, Larry Sanger, and Steven Pinker.

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Would More Regulations Curb NCAA Violations?

Shawn Klein is quoted in this article from Coach and Athletic Director magazine examining the use of more regulations to curb NCAA violations. In the article, Klein states: “I don’t know that stricter policies or punishment would be that much more effective, because part of the problem is that there are so many rules and a lot of them are opaque.” Read the full article.

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CEE Guest Speaker Series

Marta Podemska-Mikluch, a visiting professor of Economics at Beloit College and recent Ph.D. graduate from George Mason University, was CEE’s guest speaker for February. She gave a talk to students and professors on “Succession, Elections, and Self-Governance,” focusing on the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth’s “nobles’ democracy” of the 16th century.

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See you next week!

Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

Kaizen Weekly Review – February 22, 2013

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor: Virginia Murr

Give Lance Armstrong Another Chance?

CEE Professor Shawn Klein, who runs the popular Sports Ethicist blog, gave his opinion to CNN on the Lance Armstrong scandal. Klein writes: “Violating the arbitrary rules of a sport shows a character flaw and poor judgment, but it is hard to see who else is truly harmed by such actions.” For more, click here.

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Professor Klein on Podcast

Klein was also interviewed by Rockford University Radio, discussing why he became a professor, his book Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts, and Ayn Rand and the Atlas Shrugged movies.

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Explaining Postmodernism in Iran

Dr. Stephen Hicks’s Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault has been translated into Persian by H. P. Safir and published by one of Iran’s biggest publishers, Qoqnoos Publishing House in Tehran. Click here to view the web page for the Persian translation of Explaining Postmodernism. Information on other editions and translations of the book can be found here.

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Television Interview in Houston

While in Houston giving a talk to the Houston Property Rights Association on “Free Market Philosophy in the Classroom,” Dr. Hicks appeared for an interview on David Hutzelman’s television show. The interview covered entrepreneurial ethics, why business ethics should focus on the positive more than the negative, and our cultural progress in developing institutions of trust. Here is the interview:

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Teaching Liberty at UIS

After two years of hard work, CEE guest speaker Professor William Kline had his Liberty Studies minor approved by the University of Illinois at Springfield’s Campus Senate. View CEE’s interview with Professor Kline.

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Filling a Gap in Business Ethics

Another CEE guest speaker, Professor Alexei Marcoux of Loyola University Chicago, working in conjunction with Professor Chris MacDonald, has launched Business Ethics Journal Review (BEJR), which went live on February 14, 2013. BEJR is an open-access academic journal publishing peer-reviewed commentaries and facilitating broad discussion. Watch CEE’s interview with Professor Marcoux.

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Innovations in Modern Medicine Illustrated

This Forbes article includes a striking visual created by Leon Farrant, a graphic designer in Purchase, N.Y., showing how vaccinations have impacted our lives, “driv[ing] home how effective the common childhood inoculations, made by Merck, Sanofi, GlaxoSmithKline, and Novartis, are.”

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Sold Out Concert? Attend Anyway

Kaizen interviewee Judy Estrin has teamed up with her son David Carrico to bring an interactive concert hall to the Web. According to this techcrunch.com article, EvntLive is intended to “create a scalable platform to stream live concerts ranging from sold-out arenas to intimate clubs, backed by a curated library of shows fans may have missed, integrated with social media, behind-the-scenes video and e-commerce.” Read CEE’s interview with entrepreneur Judy Estrin.

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See you next week!

[Previous Issues of KWR.]

Shawn Klein to be Featured on WREX 13 News

Thursday, January 17th, 2013

Channel 13 News came by the CEE office today to interview Dr. Shawn Klein about sports ethics and Lance Armstrong’s use of performance enhancing drugs. Watch WREX Morning News (January 18) or check out their video page if you missed it.

A short article about the interview was posted here.

Check the Sports Ethicist blog for further updates.

Shawn Klein on Lance Armstrong’s Doping Confession

Thursday, January 17th, 2013

Lance Armstrong’s much-publicized interview with Oprah, in which he reportedly confesses to using performance enhancing drugs, will air tonight (January 17, 9pm ET, OWN). CNN asked columnists, authors, and sportswriters whether we should “give Lance another chance.” CEE professor Shawn Klein was among the responses CNN published. Dr. Klein wrote:

“After years of adamant denials and protestations of his innocence, Lance Armstrong has reportedly come forward to admit his use of prohibited performance enhancing drugs. If Armstrong is sincerely contrite and forthright in his apology, most people, including myself, will forgive him for his use of prohibited drugs.

He cheated in a sport known for its widespread cheating; that doesn’t justify his use but it does put his actions into an understandable context that makes it easier to excuse the use. Further, if Armstrong cooperates with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, his lifetime ban from cycling ought to be reduced to something more reasonable.

The more troubling aspects of the Armstrong case are the allegations that he harassed and intimidated team members and potential whistle-blowers. Violating the arbitrary rules of a sport shows a character flaw and poor judgment, but it is hard to see who else is truly harmed by such actions. But to threaten, intimidate and coerce others (either to use performance enhancing drugs themselves or to cover up his team’s use) causes real harm.

Even if only some of these reports are accurate, Armstrong will have to do more than sit on Oprah’s couch to earn forgiveness.”

Read more opinions on Armstrong’s confession here.

Related: Shawn Klein on the arguments against the use of performance enhancing technologies.

Call for Abstracts: 2013 Rockford University Sports Studies Symposium

Monday, October 8th, 2012

From Professor Shawn Klein’s Sports Ethicist blog:

Call for Abstracts

Fandom, Fantasy, and Fitness
The 2nd Annual Rockford University Sports Studies Symposium
Date: April 19, 2013

Grace Roper Lounge
Rockford University
5050 E. State. St.
Rockford, IL 61108

Fans play a central role at all levels and within various aspects of sport, so any study of sport would do well to consider their influences in connection to fandom, fantasy, and fitness. A specific and growing area of fandom, fantasy sports, illustrates a concrete and complex way fans relate to and even affect sport. Moreover, the implicit and explicit connection of sport to fitness offers another important way that fans interact with sport. This year’s symposium seeks to explore and examine these aspects of the relationship between fan and sport.

We invite scholars from all disciplines to submit an abstract on these themes. This symposium will then bring together several panels of scholars to discuss these themes. The focus of each panel will depend, in part, on the submitted abstracts. Each presenter on a panel will have 20 minutes for their presentation. This will be followed by 30 minutes of a combined Q&A.

Abstract Submission:
Submissions are welcome on this theme of Fandom, Fantasy, and Fitness, or other related issues arising in the study of Sport. Abstract should be 300-500 words. Send via email (as PDF) to SSS13[at]Rockford.edu

Deadline: Friday, January 25th, 2013.
Notification of Acceptance: Monday, February 4th, 2013.

If you have any questions, please email SSS13[at]Rockford.edu, contact Shawn Klein (Assistant Professor, Philosophy Department) at 815-226-4115, or Michael Perry (Assistant Professor, English Department) at 815-226-4098.

Shawn Klein Interviewed by The New York Times

Monday, August 13th, 2012

CEE Professor Shawn Klein was interviewed by another major publication, The New York Times, on sports ethics. The article discusses bending the rules in sports, and whether an athlete who has attained sports excellence has necessarily attained moral excellence.

Read the New York Times article here.

Read Professor Klein’s article at his Sports Ethicist blog.