Archive for the ‘Publications’ Category

Stephen Hicks lecture tour in Poland

Monday, February 13th, 2017

Stephen-in-Poland-800x445

EP-Polish-slant-1024x768From January 6-16 Stephen Hicks gave a total of eight talks in Poland: Bydgoszcz, Chojnice, Warszawa, and Kraków. Several of the talks are tied to the newly-published Polish edition of his Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault.

The Polish translation by Piotr Kostyło and Katarzyna Nowak was published as Zrozumieć postmodernizm. Sceptycyzm i socjalizm od Rousseau do Foucaulta (University of Kasimir the Great Press, 2016).

Much thanks to the following individuals for their warm invitations: Dr. Przemek Zientkowski of Chojnice, Professor Hanna Kostyło of the Bydgoszcz University, Professor Rafał Godoń of the University of Warsaw,
Professor Katarzyna Wrońska of Jagiellonian University in Kraków, and especially to Dr. Piotr Kostyło of the University of Kasimir the Great.

O que podemos aprender do empreendedorismo [PDF]

Saturday, August 20th, 2016

Stephen Hicks’s article “What Entrepreneurship Can Teach Us About Life” was published in English by The Wall Street Journal. The article has since been translated into Portuguese and can be found at Libertarianismo.org.

A PDF of the article is available here as well.

Stephen Hicks’s article published at The Savvy Street

Wednesday, May 11th, 2016

The_Savvy_StreetStephen Hicks’s article “The Moral High Ground of Free Trade” has been published at The Savvy Street. Read the article here at their site.

Stephen Hicks’s article published in The Wall Street Journal

Monday, May 2nd, 2016

wsj logoStephen Hicks’s article “What Entrepreneurs Can Teach Us All About Life” has been published by The Wall Street Journal. Here is a snippet:

“We often think of entrepreneurs as larger-than-life characters. They take big risks. They make their own rules. They innovate and experiment, questioning things everybody else takes for granted.

“It can almost seem like entrepreneurs are a breed apart. But they’re not. All of us are born with the ability to take risks, think creatively and challenge the everyday way of doing things. And as hokey as this can sound, we would all do well to tap into those traits in both our lives and our careers, whether we work for ourselves or not …”

Read the article at their site here.

 

Stephen Hicks’s article to be published in The Wall Street Journal

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016

wsj logoOn May 2, The Wall Street Journal will publish Stephen Hicks’s article “What Entrepreneurs Can Teach Us All About Life.” Here is the opening snippet:

“We often think of entrepreneurs as larger-than-life characters. They take big risks. They make their own rules. They innovate and experiment, questioning things everybody else takes for granted.

“It can almost seem like entrepreneurs are a breed apart. But they’re not. All of us are born with the ability to take risks, think creatively and challenge the everyday way of doing things. And as hokey as this can sound, we would all do well to tap into those traits in both our lives and our careers, whether we work for ourselves or not …”

We will post more when the article is published on Monday, May 2.

Book chapter forthcoming: “Entrepreneurship’s Relationship to CSR”

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Stephen Hicks has a chapter forthcoming in this new volume:

CSR, Sustainability, Ethics & Governance: Building New Bridges between Business and Society

Editors: Hualiang Lu (Nanjing, China), René Schmidpeter (Cologne, Germany), Nicholas Capaldi (New Orleans, USA), Liangrong Zu, (Turin, Italy)
Publisher: Springer Books.
Date: 2016

Abstract:

Entrepreneurship’s Relationship to CSR (Prof. Dr. Stephen R.C. Hicks)

This chapter rethinks the start of business ethics. The author agrees that the Corporate Social Responsibility model of business ethics has been a leading paradigm. But the author notices that CSR practitioners usually take large firms as representative of business and address their ethical issues; this, he believes, leads to over-generalizing. But most people do not work in mid-to-large corporations; rather, they are sole proprietors, in a partnership, in a family firm, or in an entrepreneurial venture. Also, every large corporation began as an entrepreneurial venture. Therefore, the author argues that business ethics should begin where business begins. In other words, business ethics begins with entrepreneurship. The author first situates ethics in an entrepreneurial context to identify the core values, virtues, and vices of business. Then he addresses how those ethical issues scale as the business succeeds or fails at growing into large corporation.

[More information forthcoming upon publication.]

Kaizen Weekly Review – February 22, 2013

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor: Virginia Murr

Give Lance Armstrong Another Chance?

CEE Professor Shawn Klein, who runs the popular Sports Ethicist blog, gave his opinion to CNN on the Lance Armstrong scandal. Klein writes: “Violating the arbitrary rules of a sport shows a character flaw and poor judgment, but it is hard to see who else is truly harmed by such actions.” For more, click here.

.

Professor Klein on Podcast

Klein was also interviewed by Rockford University Radio, discussing why he became a professor, his book Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts, and Ayn Rand and the Atlas Shrugged movies.

.

Explaining Postmodernism in Iran

Dr. Stephen Hicks’s Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault has been translated into Persian by H. P. Safir and published by one of Iran’s biggest publishers, Qoqnoos Publishing House in Tehran. Click here to view the web page for the Persian translation of Explaining Postmodernism. Information on other editions and translations of the book can be found here.

.
.
.

Television Interview in Houston

While in Houston giving a talk to the Houston Property Rights Association on “Free Market Philosophy in the Classroom,” Dr. Hicks appeared for an interview on David Hutzelman’s television show. The interview covered entrepreneurial ethics, why business ethics should focus on the positive more than the negative, and our cultural progress in developing institutions of trust. Here is the interview:

.

Teaching Liberty at UIS

After two years of hard work, CEE guest speaker Professor William Kline had his Liberty Studies minor approved by the University of Illinois at Springfield’s Campus Senate. View CEE’s interview with Professor Kline.

.

Filling a Gap in Business Ethics

Another CEE guest speaker, Professor Alexei Marcoux of Loyola University Chicago, working in conjunction with Professor Chris MacDonald, has launched Business Ethics Journal Review (BEJR), which went live on February 14, 2013. BEJR is an open-access academic journal publishing peer-reviewed commentaries and facilitating broad discussion. Watch CEE’s interview with Professor Marcoux.

.

.

Innovations in Modern Medicine Illustrated

This Forbes article includes a striking visual created by Leon Farrant, a graphic designer in Purchase, N.Y., showing how vaccinations have impacted our lives, “driv[ing] home how effective the common childhood inoculations, made by Merck, Sanofi, GlaxoSmithKline, and Novartis, are.”

.

.

.

Sold Out Concert? Attend Anyway

Kaizen interviewee Judy Estrin has teamed up with her son David Carrico to bring an interactive concert hall to the Web. According to this techcrunch.com article, EvntLive is intended to “create a scalable platform to stream live concerts ranging from sold-out arenas to intimate clubs, backed by a curated library of shows fans may have missed, integrated with social media, behind-the-scenes video and e-commerce.” Read CEE’s interview with entrepreneur Judy Estrin.

..

See you next week!

[Previous Issues of KWR.]

The End of the University as We Know It

Monday, January 14th, 2013

Nathan Harden writes a sweeping overview of “The End of the University as We Know It” for The American Interest Magazine. “We have reached a tipping point where new interactive web technology, coupled with widespread access to broadband internet service and increased student comfort interacting online, will send online education mainstream,” Harden says. Online students may miss out on some of the advantages of a residential college experience, but they will learn more efficiently, be able to choose from a more varied curriculum, and enjoy greater convenience, all at a lower price than traditional residential students pay. And universities will have to adopt this new model or become obsolete.

Read the full article here.

Related: Dr. Stephen Hicks’s entire Philosophy of Education course is now available online.

Train Your Brain to Stay Focused

Thursday, January 3rd, 2013

Entrepreneurs dictate their own work schedules, so they must learn to maintain focus amidst daily distractions. Entrepreneur Magazine has a useful list of tips for training your brain to stay focused.

Read the list here.

Related: Dr. Stephen Hicks on the Entrepreneurial Process.

Interview with William and Wilson Ling

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012

William and Wilson Ling are shareholders and board members of Petropar S.A., one of the major producers of aluminum beverage cans and plastic closures in Brazil, and the world’s second largest supplier of lightweight spunmelt nonwovens fabrics for disposable hygiene applications.

Kaizen: To start with your background and how Petropar began. You were born in Brazil?

Wilson: All four Ling siblings are Brazilian—Winston (born 1955), William (1957), Rosa (1959), and Wilson (1961).

Kaizen: Your parents immigrated from China in the 1950s?

William: Our father, Sheun Ming Ling, was born in Beijing in 1921 and was raised in Wenzhou. He left China in 1948, in the wake of the communist revolution, first to Taiwan. In early 1950 he went to Hong Kong where he met Lydia Wong who was born in 1928, in Shanghai.

Our father wasn’t educated in a formal school; he was homeschooled. It was usual at that time for families to do homeschooling. So basically his education was at home with private tutors.

He lost his father when he was young—at age 12. So he stopped studying and started working as an apprentice. He joined the China Vegetable Oil Company (CVOC), which was a large entity with state and private ownership that had a virtual monopoly in the vegetable oil industry. It was there where he acquired all his experience in this industry. But he always worked as an accountant or as an auditor. He wasn’t involved in operations. He knew the operations from his work as an auditor.

(more…)