Archive for the ‘KWR’ Category

CEE Review: hackerpsaces, entrepreneurial Hell, Business Ethics Journal Review, and more

Wednesday, February 12th, 2014

News in entrepreneurship, ethics, and political economy.

News and Opinion

Professors Alexei Marcoux (whom we featured here) and Chris MacDonald launched the Business Ethics Journal Review in 2013, so check out the results of its lively first year.

Hackerspaces and the liberal arts: experimental open labs in Asia.

Stephanie St. Claire has been to entrepreneurial Hell and back: 11 Things I Wish I Knew When I Started My Business.

A map of bribery around the world, overall and by industry sector. Map made by the James Mintz Group.

The state of entrepreneurship 2014: “Respondents report increased access to credit and greater use of personal savings” according to the annual Kauffman Foundation/LegalZoom survey. Also: angels deals are down.

Announcements

Business ethics professor Nicholas Capaldi, whom we interviewed here, and the Global Corporate Governance Institute announce a conference in London, England in August.

On March 5 Stephen Hicks will be giving a lecture at California Lutheran University. The title of his talk is “Postmodernism and Its Discontents,” which draws upon the themes of his Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault.

See you next time for with our digest of new and interesting items in entrepreneurship, ethics, and political economy.

The Capitalist Heart Surgeon, Silicon Valley’s Start-up Machine, Advice for Success, Censorship and Business, Hicks on Poverty to Prosperity, Defining Competition

Friday, August 9th, 2013

KWR title- 19
Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

.

The Capitalist Heart Surgeon
Dr.-Devi-ShettyDubbed “India’s Walmart of Heart Surgery,” Devi Shetty is a heart surgeon-turned-businessman who has cut the cost of heart surgery by 98 percent to just US$1,555. The same procedure costs US$106,385 at Ohio’s Cleveland Clinic. This article explains that Shetty keeps the costs low in his 21 medical centers by buying cheaper scrubs, using air conditioning only in the most essential rooms, and through other efficiencies..
.
.

Silicon Valley’s Start-up Machine
silicon-valleys-most-important-startup-factory-y-combinator-is-shrinkingY Combinator is an organization founded by Paul Graham that accelerates the early phases for start-ups. Its first graduating class in 2005 included Reddit, Infogami, Dropbox, Airbnb, and Stripe. Y Combinator holds two three-month sessions every year. During that time, start-up founders receive mentoring at regular meetings with each of Y Combinator’s partners. Read more.

.
.
.

Censorship Inhibiting Entrepreneurship in Quebec
censorshipAccording to the province of Quebec’s censors, “Wellarc” is too English to be used as a business name. The entrepreneur who proposed the name is Xavier Menard, a 17 year old from Quebec. Menard is up against Quebec’s Bill 101, which requires that businesses in Quebec have French names and signs. According to this article, Menard responded to the government with a video in which he argues that it doesn’t make sense to limit the choices of Quebec businesses when the province has a high unemployment rate..
.
.

Essential Advice for Success
bob-lefsetzAccording to Bob Lefsetz, embracing individuality is an essential cornerstone to success. Other factors include: the personal touch, quality over quantity, and understanding that talent is not god-given. According to Lefstez, “None of us are perfect, we can all improve, we all make mistakes. But let me be clear, ignore the haters, ignore advice unless you’re asking for it.” Read the article..

.
.
.

From Poverty to Prosperity
saupload_poverty_to_prosperityIn this post, Stephen Hicks enthusiastically reviews Arnold Kling and Nick Schulz’s From Poverty to Prosperity: Intangible Assets, Hidden Liabilities and the Lasting Triumph over Scarcity. Hicks likes the authors’ emphasis on the foundational economic role of entrepreneurs, their insistence upon the study of real human agents, and their assumption that “win-win social relations are normal and the proper benchmark, not the usual expectation of zero-sum.”.

.
.
Defining Competition
sports ethicistAs part of a recent seminar, Shawn Klein (a.k.a. the Sports Ethicist), developed a genus-species definition of competition. What do competition in business and sports have in common? Is war properly described as a competition? Are two animals fighting over mates or food competing? Klein elaborates on why certain aspects of competition were rejected and others included. Read more.

.
.
.

See you in two weeks!

.
Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.


The Frontier of Diagnostic Medicine, Business without Bosses, Interns Sue over Wages, Advice from Elite Entrepreneurs, Entrepreneurial Education, Explaining Postmodernism

Friday, July 26th, 2013

KWR title18

Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

.

The Frontier of Diagnostic Medicine
iknife New developments in medical technology are paving the way for longer, healthier lives. In this article, Ray Kurzweil discusses the iKnife, which uses an electrical current to diagnose cancer. And this article explains how the use of “smart” pills to monitor everything “from your vitals to blood flow to temperature in real time” could be mainstream as early as 2014..
.

.
.

Business without Bosses
PGreenIn this interview, Paul Green, Jr. from the Morning Star Self-Management Institute explains Morning Star’s innovative business model that focuses on self-responsibility and self-management over bureaucracies and bosses. According to Green, this model is premised on “a principle that basically states: to the degree people do all that they agree to do, and don’t initiate force against others or their property, happiness and prosperity will emerge.” Read more about Morning Star’s business vision..

.
.

Interns Sue Over Wages
money-bags3Historically, unpaid internships have offered college students invaluable on-the-job training and education. However, in two recent cases, interns have filed lawsuits for lack of payment against the companies that provided them with internships. This article details the lawsuits against Condé Nast and NBC Universal. Read the complaint against NBC Universal.

.

..

.
.

New Chapter from Audiobook Version of Explaining Postmodernism
explaining postmodernismThe sixth and final chapter from Stephen Hicks’s Explaining Postmodernism audiobook has been released. In this chapter, “Postmodern Strategy,” Hicks discusses Rorty’s, Foucault’s, and Derrida’s contribution to postmodernist strategy — and its political implications: “Why has a leading segment of the political Left adopted skeptical and relativist epistemological strategies?”

.
.
.
.
.

Advice from Elite Entrepreneurs
Entrepreneur MindYou should put your job before your family. You should disregard your passion in favor of practicality. These unusual-sounding pieces of advice come from some of the most successful entrepreneurs in the world. In his new book, The Entrepreneur Mind, serial entrepreneur Kevin D. Johnson outlines 100 essential beliefs, insights, and habits of serious entrepreneurs. Read 10 gems from the book in this Forbes article.

.
.
.

An Online Master’s Degree in Computer Science?
online-degreeThe Georgia Institute of Technology has created a solution to America’s shortage of computer-science experts. According to this Wall Street Journal article, Georgia Tech is now offering an online master’s degree in computer science. This new offering not only allows more people to participate in the degree program, but it costs students just a quarter of the cost of a typical degree.

.
.
.

See you in two weeks!

.
Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.


Wearable Technology, Regulators vs. Mom Entrepreneur, Quantifying Regulation, Hayek on Intellectuals and Nazis, Solving Mankind’s Biggest Problems, (Breast) Feeding Frenzy

Friday, July 12th, 2013

KWR title 17

Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

.

Fashion Meets Technology
13-GoogleGlassModel_1_620x465Technology is quickly becoming a fashion statement. A short list of trendy technologies include: Apple iWatch, Apple smart shoes, Google Glass, Nike+ FuelBand, and LUMOback, an 8.55 mm-thick sensor worn on a belt around the waist that wirelessly tracks movement and activity. Read more about the latest developments in wearable technology.

.

.
.
.

Volunteers Not Allowed
Rhea Lana ToysRhea Lana Riner, entrepreneur and mother of three, created a consignment business that uses an innovative business model: Customers at rented pop-up locations could volunteer to set up the sale in exchange for dibs on shopping. This new model caught the attention of the Department of Labor, which decided that Riner’s volunteers should be treated as employees. Has Riner treated her customers unfairly? Or is Riner being “stifled by outmoded dictates?” Read the article.

.

.

Quantifying Regulation at the Mercatus Center
CHP_Commerce_Trade_BooksDetermined to change the flawed methodologies in most statistics on government regulation, Patrick A. McLaughlin, Omar Al-Ubaydli, and the Mercatus Center at George Mason University have developed RegData, “the first tool to allow for industry-specific quantification of federal regulation, permitting within-industry and between-industry analyses of the causes and effects of federal regulations.”

..

.
.

Hayek on Intellectuals and the Nazis
hayek-1 In this post, Stephen Hicks looks at Friedrich Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom, which was published at the height of World War II. Hicks points out that the intellectual activism of such socialist thinkers as Werner Sombart, Johann Plenge, Friedrich Nauman, Paul Lensch, Moeller van den Bruck, and Oswald Spengler caused Hayek to believe that “Germany’s brightest minds developed the theory and laid the cultural groundwork for the Nazi political transformation.”

.
.

We are Solving Mankind’s Biggest Problems
Abundance_book_cover-212x299In this article, the Atlas Society’s Edward Hudgins reviews two books: Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think by Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler, and Merchants of Despair: Radical Environmentalists, Criminal Pseudo-Scientists, and the Fatal Cult of Antihumanism by Robert Zubrin. While each book takes a different approach, Hudgins concludes that both “offer us components for a new Enlightenment synthesis that can usher in profound cultural changes well beyond the particulars in the pages of these books.”

.

(Breast) Feeding Frenzy at the University of Virginia
Paul Tudor JonesHow difficult is it for women to combine high-powered careers with motherhood? Paul Tudor Jones, a hedge fund manager and donor to the University of Virginia, recently incited the opposition of media outlets, the Provost, and 82 faculty members. At a panel discussion on financial trading at the University’s McIntire School of Commerce, Jones stated, “[I]t is difficult for mothers to be successful traders because connecting with a child is a focus ‘killer’ … . As soon as that baby’s lips touched that girl’s bosom, forget it.” Read John Rosenberg’s assessment of the fallout from Jones’s incendiary remarks.

.

See you in two weeks!

.
Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

 


Richard Branson on Risk, 3D Printing, Liability for Drunk Employees, Poverty Professionals, Think Tanks as Educators, Business Ethics

Friday, June 28th, 2013

KWR title16
Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

.

Richard Branson on Taking Risks
Richard BransonRoutine can be deadly to a business. In this article, Richard Branson explains that adding risk-taking to your business can spawn great innovations as well as workplace fun: “One of the great benefits of taking on challenges in your working life is that you and your team learn to confront risk together — and also to lose sometimes, because when you make a good wager, the odds are not going to be in your favor.”

.
.
.

3D Printing and the New Industrial Revolution
3dprinterThough 3D printing was first developed in 1984, the technology is finally becoming mainstream — Amazon has even dedicated a storefront to it. What does this new technology mean for the big picture? Professor Richard D’Aveni of Dartmouth College states, “We’re on the verge of the next industrial revolution, no doubt about it.” Read the article.

.
.
.
.

Should Companies be Liable for Drunk Employees?
drinksAfter becoming inebriated at a company party, an employee attempted to slide down the rail of an escalator, causing her to fall nearly 25 feet to the ground. Sustaining numerous injuries, she sued her company for workman’s compensation, arguing that even while companies are not usually liable for an employee’s actions while drunk, “there is an exception when the alcohol is ‘supplied by the employer.'” Read about the verdict.

.
.
.

Bill Frezza on the Poverty Professionals
Food StampsIn 2012, welfare programs cost taxpayers nearly $588 billion, much of which went to overhead for government and private administration. In this Forbes article, “Poverty Professionals and The Crony Capitalists Who Love Them,” Bill Frezza discusses the high costs, the lack of transparency, and why “the marriage of convenience between the financial services industry and federal bureaucrats is no laughing matter.”

.
.
.

Think Tanks: The Universities of the 21st Century?
UFMThink tanks such as the Atlas Economic Research Foundation and the Ludwig von Mises Institute are making waves in higher education. Some have transformed into or spawned new universities, and some are offering inexpensive, Massive Online Open Courses as an alternative for commuter students. Read more about the evolution of higher education and how think tanks are on the forefront.

.
.
.

The Ethics of Experimental Drugs
FDA_1Should terminal cancer patients have the right to take experimental medications? Are companies taking unfair advantage of sick, desperate people? In this segment of his Business Ethics Cases series, Stephen Hicks discusses the arguments for and against experimental cancer drugs by examining the infamous Laetrile case.

.
.
.
.

See you in two weeks!

.
Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

 


Weighing Privacy Rights, Monsanto’s Seed Patents, Teen Innovators, Entrepreneurship for School Reform, The Crisis of Socialism, and Debating Hockey Fights

Friday, June 14th, 2013

KWR title15a
Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

.

Do Privacy Rights Matter?
cellphonellAmericans have had a lot to digest lately. Not only was it reported that phone companies have been selling customers’ personal information to third parties, but Americans have also learned that their government has been tracking their metadata through their phones. Do Americans care? According to this summation of several surveys from the Electronic Privacy Information Center, “the importance of privacy has steadily trended upward over seven years.”.

.

The Future is Bright: Amazing Teen Innovators
Teen-Phone Capacitor-2Worried about the ingenuity of our next generation? Consider this: An 18-year-old has developed a capacitor that charges cellphones in under 30 seconds. In the booming market of apps, a teen has contributed an emergency-notification app. One teen designed a low-cost, self-driving car. Another teen has created a single-person submarine. And this 15-year-old budding scientist has developed a fast, low-cost blood test to detect pancreatic cancer..

.

.

Big Win for Monsanto’s Intellectual Property Rights
Monsanto Seeds 3Would innovation happen without intellectual property rights and the profit-motive? In a major win for intellectual property rights, the Supreme Court recently decided in Bowman v. Monsanto Co. that the farmer, Vernon Bowman, had infringed on Monsanto’s patent rights when he copied and used the seeds he yielded from a crop of Monsanto, patent-protected seeds. Read more about the case and decision.

.

..

Is Entrepreneurship the Key to School Reform?
Student Voice Live 2At a recent event in New York, Dell and a student advocacy group, StudentVoice, hosted a day-long conference devoted to exploring ways schools can introduce entrepreneurship in the classroom. According to Zak Malamed, co-founder of StudentVoice, “Research shows that it’s entrepreneurial innovation that will lead to global economic recovery, and it’s important to nurture this entrepreneurial spirit from a young age.” Read more about the event and panelists.

.

.

New Chapters from Audiobook Version of Explaining Postmodernism
explaining postmodernismTwo more chapters from Stephen Hicks’s Explaining Postmodernism audiobook have been released. Chapter Four takes an in-depth look at “The Climate of Collectivism” in nineteenth- and twentieth-century political thought, and Chapter Five explores how the “The Crisis of Socialism” led to Postmodernism.

.

.

.

<span
Five for Fighting: Is Hockey Fighting Justified?
sports ethicistFor many hockey fans, fights are a natural and enjoyable part of the game. But is the fighting justified? The Sports Ethicist, Shawn Klein, takes a look at the most common justifications for hockey fights. In his assessment, Klein opines that “it is a lack of sportsmanship and self-control, and overall does more harm to the sport than any purported benefits.”

.

.

.

See you in two weeks!

.
Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

 


Peter Thiel and the Future of Security, The Quantum Leap, Sex Injuries on the Job, Jimi Hendrix the Entrepreneur, Stephen Hicks in Stockholm, and Teaching Entrepreneurship

Friday, May 31st, 2013

KWR title14Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

.

Peter Thiel: Funding the Future of Security
Thiel - SmallLife-saving and cost-effective, the robotic security guard could change the face of security as we know it and PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel is helping to lead the charge. To the tune of $5 million, Thiel has joined six other investors in backing security robot maker RoboteX, the creator of the Avatar series Security Robot, which “can be programmed to follow patrol routes and respond to alarms, or be manually controlled to inspect incidents.” Read the article.

.
.

Taking the Quantum Leap
Quantum 3In a shocking revelation, the government recently announced that it has been running a quantum internet cable at Los Alamos National labs for more than two years. While this news tantalizes with the prospect of perfectly secure communications, it isn’t the only quantum application on the horizon. Chinese physicists have unveiled a quantum router and D-Wave Systems has built the world’s first commercially viable quantum computer.

.
.

Are Companies Liable for Sex Injuries?
Contract - smallIn this post, Stephen Hicks considers the case of an Australian woman who sued her employer, the Australian government, for injuries incurred while on a business trip. During the trip, she was injured as she engaged in consensual sex at her hotel room. According to the woman, she was on company time and, therefore, should be paid workman’s compensation. Find out how the courts ruled.

.
.
.

Jimi Hendrix the Entrepreneur
Hendrix - SmallWhat do Andrew Carnegie, Steve Jobs, and Jimi Hendrix have in common? They were all successful entrepreneurs. In this article, Steve Mariotti explains that Hendrix “was a master of branding — everything from his flamboyant wardrobe to dramatic stage antics like setting his guitar on fire reinforced his wild, sexual, rock rebel image. These marketing ploys drew attention to his real competitive advantage, which was his genius guitar playing.”

.
.

Stephen Hicks Gives Talk in Stockholm
steve 2-26-13Last week, Hicks participated in a colloquium on “Virtues and Entrepreneurship,” organized by Sweden’s Ratio Institute. His talk was an extension of the theme of his “What Business Ethics Can Learn from Entrepreneurship,” arguing that the success traits of entrepreneurship map onto an updated Aristotelian virtue set. Read more about the conference.

.
.
.
.

Teaching Entrepreneurship to High School Students
eday3At this year’s High School Entrepreneur Day, co-sponsored by the EBA department and CEE, more than 120 local high school students learned about many facets of entrepreneurship from CEE professors and received advice from a panel of local entrepreneurs. Read more about High School Entrepreneur Day activities.

.

See you in two weeks!

.
Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

 


The Watch of the Future, Netflix’s Success, Internet Ethics, Spreading Business Ethics, The Sports Ethicist, and Representational Art

Friday, May 17th, 2013

KWR title13

Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

.

Netflix: Back from the Brink of Destruction
house of cardsIt was a business disaster. In 2011, Netflix rolled out Qwikster, which “tried to both raise prices and spin off its DVD-by-mail business.” The media wrote scathing reviews and Netflix shares plunged. How did a Netflix CEO Reed Hastings bring his company back from the brink of destruction? According to Richard Greenfield, a media analyst for BTIG, “He [Reed] dusted himself off, stood back up and started running.” Read more.

.
.

The Rub with Workplace Ethics
shhhWhat influences employees to speak out about ethical violations in the workplace? To find out, University of Michigan professor David Mayer and his colleagues conducted three studies. According to Mayer, the results “contradict conventional wisdom that the personal characteristics of an employee drive his or her decision to speak up.”

.
.
.
.

The Watch of the Future
watchThis Tech Crunch article reviews the Ressence Type 3, a liquid-filled mechanical watch with a nearly featureless face that winds automatically. The dials look like they are seamlessly embedded in the face surface, which spins. As well, a pressure valve compensates for temperature-related changes in the liquid. View the product page.

.
.
.
.

Internet Ethics Problems from Silicon Valley
mobile deviceThe Markkula Center for Applied Ethics in Silicon Valley has a web page dedicated to ethics and the Internet. The site hosts a series of brief videos on key issues in Internet ethics, as identified by Silicon Valley leaders. Participants include the co-founders of Adobe and Reputation.com, as well as the CEOs of Symantec and Seagate.

.
.
.
.

The Future of Art
representational artIn April, Stephen Hicks attended a meeting of minds in California to discuss key issues in representational aesthetics in preparation for next year’s Representational Art Conference (TRAC). TRAC 2014 will focus on the aesthetic principles and values implicit in the representational art of the twenty-first century. The conference will be held March 2 – 5, 2014 in Ventura Beach, California.

.
.
.

Taking a Swing at the Designated Hitter Rule
sports ethicistThe Sports Ethicist’s radio program recently covered the Designated Hitter Rule in MLB. The rule has been in place for 40 years, yet still remains as controversial as ever. Does it remove the need for managerial strategy? Does it add excitement and offense to the game? Listen here as Professor Shawn Klein, Zachary Wolf, Daryn Streed, as well as Professors Matt Flamm and Mike Perry discuss the DH rule and its effects on baseball.

.
.
.

With summer upon us, we will be producing the Kaizen Weekly Review on a biweekly basis. See you in two weeks!

.
Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

 

KWR: Ralph Lauren Displays Integrity in Scandal, Stay Online When the Power Goes Out, Virtue of Productiveness, Kaizen in Brazil, Classical Liberalism and Evolution, Minimum Wage Laws

Friday, May 10th, 2013

KWR title12

Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

.

Ralph Lauren Displays Integrity in Bribery Scandal
poloRalph Lauren discovered that one of its subsidiaries had been bribing Argentinian officials. Not only did the company report the violation to the SEC themselves, but it did so knowing that it would have to pay heavy fines for the subsidiary’s actions. According to the company’s attorney, Tom Hanusik, “Ralph Lauren did all the right things in this situation.” Read the article.

.
.
.

Innovation in Connectivity
brckOur modern-era concern when a storm comes is not that we’ll lose light if the power goes out, but that we will lose the internet. Until now. Ushahidi, a non-profit technology company that builds open source software and digital tools, has created the BRCK, a convenient, portable, and durable device that can “provide failsafe internet connectivity in almost any situation.” Read more about the BRCK in this article from Forbes.

.
.

William Thomas on the Virtue of Productiveness
William R. Thomas is currently a lecturer in the Department of Economics at the University at Albany and the director of programs for The Atlas Society. In this video, Thomas discusses productive work as the central value of life, elements of the virtue of productiveness, and the entrepreneurial concept of responsibility.
.

.

Is Classical Liberalism Compatible with Darwinian Evolution?
darwinian evolution and classical liberalismProfessor Shawn Klein has contributed a chapter to the newly released Darwinian Evolution And Classical Liberalism: Theories in Tension, edited by Stephen Dilley. Klein states that Dilley “has pulled together an interesting and thought-provoking book,” which includes critical and dissenting opinions. Read the abstract of Klein’s chapter.

.
.
.
.

Business Ethics Case Study: Minimum Wages
minimum wageStephen Hicks has released another case in his Business Ethics Cases series. This video lecture examines the moral, economic, and political arguments for and against minimum wage laws.

.
.
.
.
.
.

New Issue of Kaizen Featuring Entrepreneurship in Brazil
loiferman thumbThis issue’s feature interview with entrepreneur André Loiferman, president (CEO) of the construction company Brasília Guaíba, takes us to the south of Brazil and the challenges of infrastructure as Brazil upgrades its airports, roads, ports, and other facilities in preparation for soccer’s World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016 to be held there. We also report on our recent activities at Rockford University.

.
.
.

Join Us in Our Mission
The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship focuses on the ethical infrastructure of an entrepreneurial society, as we believe that this is essential to human flourishing. Please join us by making a donation today through the PayPal link or send a check via snail-mail. Thank you for your support.


.
.
.
.
.
.
.

See you next week!

.
Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

KWR: Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, The Discovery that Could Change the World, Crowdfunding Lessons, Regulating Entrepreneurship, Explaining Postmodernism

Friday, May 3rd, 2013

Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.

Editor: Virginia Murr

.
Entrepreneurship and Public Policy
Guest speaker Dr. Robert Salvino recently spoke on “Entrepreneurship and Public Policy” at Rockford University. Salvino received his Ph.D. from Georgia State University in 2007 and currently teaches in the Department of Economics at Coastal Carolina University, South Carolina. In the video below, Salvino discusses highlights from his lecture.


This Scientific Discovery Could Change the World
Imagine giving your smart phone a long-lasting charge in just a couple seconds. Now imagine that this technology is scalable, which can lead to manufacturing and wide-scale technological implementation. Two scientists believe they have discovered a supercapacitor that can provide all of this and much more. Read more about the revolutionary supercapacitor “accidentally” discovered by chemist Richard Kaner and researcher Maher El-Kady.

.
.

Regulations that Strike the Heart of Entrepreneurship
While undergoing cancer treatment, Lauren Boice learned how difficult it is to receive cosmetology services while home-bound. Determined to help others in her situation, Boice started a dispatch business to set up appointments for home-bound individuals with cosmetologists. According to the Arizona Board of Cosmetology, however, Boice was practicing cosmetology and needed a license as well as a brick and mortar store. Read attorney Timothy Sandefur’s comments on the case.

.

Crowdfunding: Lessons for Entrepreneurs
Kauffman Dissertation Fellow Ethan Mollick examined almost 47,000 projects on Kickstarter and identified the factors that influence whether a project will succeed or not, such as having a strong geographic tie-in (e.g., pitching country music in Nashville, film in Los Angeles, etc.). Read the full article.

.
.
.
.
.

Postmodernism versus Reason
Stephen Hicks has released two more chapters from his Explaining Postmodernism audiobook. Listen to Chapter Two: “The Counter-Enlightenment Attack on Reason” and Chapter Three: “The Twentieth-Century Collapse of Reason.”

.
.
.
.
.

Join Us in Our Mission
The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship focuses on the ethical infrastructure of an entrepreneurial society, as we believe that this is necessary to human flourishing. Please join us by making a donation today through the PayPal link or send a check via snail-mail. Thank you for your support.

.

.
.



.

See you next week!

.

Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.