Archive for the ‘Announcements’ Category

CEE Review: Female entrepreneurs and venture capital | The most counterintuitive idea in the social sciences, and more

Monday, May 22nd, 2017

News and Opinion

Roger Federer: “Staying the same means going backwards.” Video at Facebook.

Female Entrepreneurs and Access to Venture Capital. Business Ethics Highlights.

How Startup Funding Works – Infographic. Funders and Founders.

America is pushing away immigrant talent. USA Today.

6 Ways to Create an Empowering Environment. Time.

It’s the 200th anniversary of the most counterintuitive idea in the social sciences. The Washington Post.

Largest ship to ever use Panama Canal transits. La Prensa. Related: Our interview with Surse Pierpoint, general manager of an import-export firm located in the Panama Canal Free Zone.

Qué nos pueden enseñar los emprendimientos acerca de la vida [Spanish translation of Stephen Hicks’s What Entrepreneurship Can Teach Us About Life, originally published in The Wall Street Journal]

Apple’s cash hoard swells to record $246.09 billion. CNBC.

Trump’s Corruption Mandate. Stephen Hicks at The Right Insight.

Idea

Machiavelli on the innovator’s challenge:
“[T]here is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things. Because the innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may do well under the new. This coolness arises partly from fear of the opponents, who have the laws on their side, and partly from the incredulity of men, who do not readily believe in new things until they have had a long experience of them.” Machiavelli, The Prince, Chapter 6.

See you next time with our digest of new and interesting items in entrepreneurship, ethics, and political economy. Here are the previous editions of CEE Review.

Coffee entrepreneur Phyllis Johnson — video interview transcript

Friday, May 19th, 2017

Interview conducted at Rockford University by Stephen Hicks and sponsored by the Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship.

Part I

Hicks: I’m Stephen Hicks. My guest today is Phyllis Johnson, who spoke in the Business and Economics Ethics class today on the theme of Coffee, Entrepreneurship, and Women in Africa. Ms. Johnson is the founder and president coffee-women-2of BD Imports, a Rockford-based entrepreneurial firm. They do wholesaling and retailing coffee all over the world.

I like your story about how you came to entrepreneurship. You got a university degree and a very nice-sounding job, but it wasn’t enough for you. Why did you become an entrepreneur?

Johnson: It’s funny because you always want to leave where you come from and what I realized after getting an university degree in microbiology, I realized that it was my family upbringing, working together on a farm in Arkansas as a family doing odd jobs, you know, throughout different seasons, that really made me want to start my own business. It created something inside me that said, you know, it’s okay to work for someone else, you can do that, but it’s also an opportunity to do something on your own, you can be a bit more creative.

Hicks: At the same time, you mentioned it was quite scary, the first steps. What was scary about it, and how did you handle that?

Johnson: Oh, gosh. It was scary for a lot of reasons. It took a long time, it was a process. I remember looking for a message, either in church or in conversations with friends that would help to persuade me to take the steps that I really wanted to take but I was afraid to take. I was afraid that my livelihood would be threatened. I was afraid of failure. I think I was afraid that what if I failed? What if it didn’t work? What if I lost financial income? And some people say we are afraid of success and I think that there could be some truth in that that we don’t quite understand. What if I could work beyond what I think is possible for me? And it’s safe to stay in a space where other people are and you don’t fit in quite so much anymore because you step outside of that realm of where you think you fit in. You spent your whole life developing friendships, relationships with people who have things in common with you, so your family know you to be who you are, so stepping into entrepreneurship really creates a different person that you might be afraid of.

Hicks: You could’ve gone on to a lot of things, but you ended putting yourself into the coffee business. There might be a connection to the family farm, something in agriculture. Why coffee in particular?

Johnson: It’s interesting because, as soon as I thought about coffee, I knew that was where I was supposed to be.

Hicks: Even though you hadn’t been a big coffee drinker up to that point.

Johnson: Even though I hadn’t been a big coffee drinker. You know, I rely a lot on intuition. I know for some business people it can sound really strange, but a lot of it is gut feeling. What feels right is what I like to go with. And, for me, I am very comfortable being on a farm. I can really appreciate the open air, the hard work, the attitude of people who work on a farm. The attitude of people who work on a farm is pretty simple. It’s not very complex a lot of times. It gives joy to see a woman carrying materials on her head, straw, whatever, to go build her house. She is not bound with ‘I do this to make a living’. She is physically making a home for herself. And so, there is a true connection sometimes with people who work on farms that keep them grounded and why they do what they do, and I think that’s very attractive for me.

Hicks: Now, when you’re getting into the coffee business as an importer-exporter, this is a worldwide business, very complicated, many major players. So you are embarking in a process of self-education to learn the business. You also mentioned you got some literature from one of the coffee organizations, in effect, warning you off: ‘Don’t try to do this.’

Johnson: Right, exactly.

Hicks: What were the obstacles they were pointing out to you and that you did have to grapple with?

Johnson: Yeah, you know, there were very realistic obstacles. I am the eighth CoffeeVillagechild of eight children, and I chose to study microbiology in college, which you don’t find women traditionally studying science and math courses. For some strange reason, I always saw myself as doing the hard stuff. Not because it was easy, but because I wanted to do the hard stuff. Why do I have to do the mamsy-pamsy stuff just because I am a girl? That has been my attitude through life. I love coffee shops. I love coffee shop owners. I just thought that I want to go a bit deeper; I want to get a bit closer to where all this comes together and be able to make impact. And, of course, you can make some sort of impact locally or nationally, but I wanted to get close to the place where it all began because I felt the intuition that I could make a difference on large scale.

But the organization that made this wonderful article when I asked about information on becoming an importer, and they sent me an article on why you should never become an importer. I became a member of the organization, I sat in the board of directors for the organization, and I still volunteer my time with the organization. I think the information was valuable, but it was also a motivator. So, it’s up to me to determine how I took that information and what it has taken to survive 12 years in this business, living through probably one of the most economic downturns in our history, for certain. It took having that sort of information about what I was embarking on to get through it.

Hicks: You mentioned that part of your drive is that you wanted to be closer to the action and you like the agricultural rootedness of coffee, so that took you to Africa. And there you found that the majority of the work in raising the coffee is done by women. But, to put it mildly, that is very challenging in a number of fronts. What were the major problems or things that bothered you when you got close to how the coffee was actually produced in Africa?

Johnson: Yeah, years ago, probably on my first trip, it was bothersome to watch a group of women sorting coffee cherries, which is what you do with part of the processing. And then, to take them to be weighed. And I remember I asked the person who was recording the weights, how, just to see this one lady’s tally sheet of what the coffee cherries she had been bringing in for weight. And so he showed it to me and he showed me about a 1,000 pounds of coffee that she had brought over a period of three, four, five months and I asked, What is her pay going to be? And he said “20 dollars” or something equivalent to 20 dollars. And I just thought about the amount of physically backbreaking labor involved in picking 1,000 pounds of coffee cherries for 20 dollars. I literally walked away in tears thinking, “I’ve got 20 dollars in my purse right now, why don’t I just give it to her?” But that would not have been the thing to do. And that was back in 2003. Luckily, today, I work with the United Nations International Trade Center to do things in a global level, in several African countries, to work with national leaders and organizations and women of all levels to make a difference. And that was the way to do it.

Part II

Hicks: One of the problems is that women are doing enormous amounts of backbreaking work, but also they are getting very little pay for it. You also mentioned that typically it is women who are doing this kind of work and men don’t do that work. Why is that?

Johnson: Well, for a couple of reasons. Women are more meticulous and they are very good at doing things that are more, you know, hand sort of work: picking stuff. But, again, a lot of time, culturally, it is the women who will go out and do a lot of the labor. So, it can be, culturally, just the way things are. But they are not in decision-making roles. And they are not comfortable in decision-making roles. They don’t feel qualified, they don’t have a history, they don’t have role models that had been in that position in the past. So, working with the International Women’s Coffee Alliance provides the network of women globally, so that women in Africa will get a chance to work with women in El Salvador and Costa Rica and Guatemala to see how these women have reason throughout the supply chain and be encouraged by that and be able to create roadmaps within their own country as how they can move up to higher levels.

Hicks: Part of the solution, then, is business education for the women. They are forming co-ops or learning how to put business structures together so that they feel comfortable in assuming the leadership roles.

Johnson: Part of the solution in the women in coffee program that I am working on with the International Trade Center we see as leadership training. We have a leadership training program that we will be working with the woman leaders, the women who had been a part of this program from the start. And they are women who are concerned about helping other women; they are community-builders. So we are having a leadership training program that will expand throughout a year for these women. We are also investigating this idea of “branding” and putting a mark on a product potentially that signifies women’s empowerment in coffee. For some corporations, having a brand or a mark isn’t so important, but it is important that women are being compensated fairly in the supply chain. So finding ways to figure out how we may approach the market with such a product is interesting, but, you know, Walmart.com just announced mid-September that they will be introducing coffee that shows empowerment for women for one of the groups of women that we work with in Costa Rica, so we are excited to see how that relationship might work.

Hicks: So, one element is the compensation level for the work that is done. The coffee-women-3other is the decision-making and the empowering so that they have the knowledge and confidence to take on leadership roles. I believe you also mentioned the issue of landownership, that, in many cases, women don’t own the land that they are working. They are not in a position to share in the profits or to grow or to mortgage the property to do various things. Why are women traditionally not owning any of land or why is that difficult for them?

Johnson: Well, you know, there has always been gender discrimination. And, in a lot of cultures, it’s better to have a male child than a female child. If you are going to educate a child, you educate the son not the daughter. So, women have just not been held in high regard. Few opportunities are given to women, but I feel that with several initiatives, global initiatives, things are changing. Women are being pushed more into the forefront. And it’s not just because women need to be women, but it’s for economic reasons. The UN global compact recently signed on to the Women Empowered principles and this is the first piece of information that allows women to be considered from an economic standpoint. We always talk about women when it comes to health and education, but, economically, how in business are women fairing? How in ownership? I don’t know the numbers off of the top of my head, but less than one percent of land ownership globally belongs to women. So we, as women, are way behind economically. As I said, of the world’s 1 billion poor, 78 percent are women. So, until the world considers women as being a part of this economic engine, we won’t get ahead. Women are working hard for less pay. They are putting up long hours, and they really need to be compensated because what they are doing with the dollars will make a difference globally. They are taking care of their children, they are educating their children, and that’s a benefit globally. So there is great value.

Hicks: So, the additional business knowledge and the changing attitude so women can own land, that will help them get a leg up the economic ladder. There are also traditional, cultural reasons, family reasons, praising boys more than praising girls. Are there also religious obstacles to be overcome or legal obstacles that just say “Women are not allowed to own property”? Do those also have to be dealt with?

Johnson: Yeah, it’s funny. When I was in Uganda, one lady — she was a Muslim lady from far region where her family worked in coffee. And she said, for religious reasons, you know, that we don’t own land from where I am from. And the laws are very confusing, you know. And we had some great discussions around that. But, what was interesting was her perspective on all of that and the lack of land-ownership, which is what is perceived to be the number 1 problem for women if you talk to them when it comes to agriculture. They don’t own land, they don’t own what’s produced in the lands, and they are just, you know, peasant workers on the land. She said, “My attitude is, while I am here,” and I kept asking what does that mean, and she said, “while I am here, I am not going to fight the things that I can’t change, but I am going to work as hard as I can to make a difference in what I do have control over.” So, you know, women are creative and they know that if change is going to happen they have to lead it. I can say that leaders of countries, leaders of industries start to pay attention when issues have been raised by different organizations, people in power. So bringing recognition and light to organizations is critical. The East African fine coffee organization, a trade support organization in East Africa that makes up several different countries that work in coffee, they have never had an indigenous women on their board in their 10-year history. They now have a gender program that they’ve developed in the last year since this program has started to bring women on board, to give them a seat at the table in all the countries where they operate. Up until now, they never considered it.

Hicks: So they are now part of the decision-making issues.

Johnson: So things are changing.

Hicks: You mentioned various organizations that you volunteer for and work for, and the United Nation’s initiative in at least five countries in Africa. Where can people go for more information about this, to follow the progress of these initiatives?

Johnson: You can go to the International Trade Center website, which is www.intracen.org or you can visit the International Women’s Coffee Alliance, just womenincoffe.org, or our website, bdimports.com, which talks about the work we do.

Hicks: Thanks for being with us today.

Johnson: Thank you, my pleasure.

[The video interview with Phyllis Johnson follows.]

Postmodernism and Making Work Beautiful: Mark Michael Lewis interview with Professor Stephen Hicks.

Sunday, May 14th, 2017

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In this video, Mark Michael Lewis and philosophy professor Stephen Hicks have a conversation about healthy and unhealthy approaches to knowledge and human thriving.

Professor Laura Grube to speak at Rockford University

Monday, May 1st, 2017

Dr. Laura Grube is a guest speaker in Stephen Hicks’s Business and Economic Ethics class today.

She is Assistant Professor of Economics at Beloit College in Wisconsin, after receiving her Ph.D. from George Mason University in Virginia. She was a Fulbright Student in South Africa and worked as a business analyst at Deloitte Consulting and senior business analyst at Perficient, Inc. Professor Grube’s research interests include Austrian economics and economic development.

Dr. Grube’s talk is sponsored by the Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship.

Arthur J. Gallagher VP Tom Tropp speaks at Rockford University

Tuesday, April 25th, 2017

Tom Tropp, Vice-president for Ethics and Culture at the Arthur J. Gallagher Corporation was a guest speaker in Stephen Hicks’s business ethics class on April 24. Gallagher is a $5 billion insurance brokerage company with almost 25,000 employees worldwide.

Gallagher was named a most ethical company for the fifth time, in large part due to Mr. Tropp’s work.

Mr. Tropp’s talk wass sponsored by the Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship.

CEE Review: Can consumers change public policies? | J.K. Rowling on Failure, and more

Monday, April 24th, 2017

News and Opinion

preserves_m2Why check-cashing stores are a good deal, according to a UPenn professor. Business Insider.

Minnesota eases restrictions on selling homemade food. Institute for Justice.

Latin America Needs to Abandon Its Victimization and Embrace the World. Panam Post.

Yes, consumers can change public policies — sometimes. Here are the challenges. The Washington Post.

13 Things You Should Give Up If You Want To Be Successful. Linkedin.

jk-rowling-twitter-profileBeing an entrepreneur is as much art as it is science. Inc.

Rent control: economists dislike it but politicians continue to like it. The issue is back on the table in Ontario. Stephen Hicks’s video lecture case study on the ethics, economics, and politics arguments back and forth.

J. K. Rowling on failure. Medium.

Michael Strong on developing group dynamics and leadership in young people. Our interview with Michael Strong at our site here.

Announcements

The 4th International Conference on Corporate Social Responsibility, Sustainability, Ethics, and Governance will be held July 26-28, 2017 in Perth, Australia. The conference theme is ‘Responsible Business for Uncertain Times and a Sustainable Future’. For more information about the conference and how to register visit the conference website.

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See you next time with our digest of new and interesting items in entrepreneurship, ethics, and political economy. Here are the previous editions of CEE Review.

CEE Review: Entrepreneurial education conference | Schools of the future, and more

Thursday, March 16th, 2017

News and Opinion

Apple-Lightbulb-cutoutTeaching Character Virtues to Prevent Bullying. Michael Strong at KoSchool.

Entrepreneurship and youth services: Quality is a way of showing respect. YouTube.

If Schools Don’t Change, Robots Will Bring On a ‘Permanent Underclass’. Vice.

Study links traits of undergraduate education to success in life. Inside Higher Ed.

Teens enter vocational school, come out with jobs, no debt. Today.

Study examines achievement gap between Asian American, white students. The Los Angeles Times.

Seven Ways School Has Imprisoned Your Mind. Foundation for Economic Education.

Could Urban Farms Be the Preschools of the Future? Citylab.

Video: Knives and fire in kindergarten? Facebook.

Why School Sucks. YouTube.

Announcements

EE 2017 Poster 2The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship will be hosting a conference at Rockford University, Illinois, on March 31 and April 1, 2017, on Entrepreneurial Education. Invited speakers include: T.K. Coleman (Praxis), María Marty (Fundación para la Responsabilidad Intelectual), Nicholas Capaldi (Loyola University New Orleans), Kevin Currie-Knight (East Carolina University), Marsha Familaro Enright (The Great Connections Seminars), Terry Noel (Illinois State University), Jed Hopkins (Edgewood College), Amy Willis (Liberty Fund), and Peggy O’Neil (University of Western Ontario). Everyone is welcome to attend free of charge! Register for the conference here. For more information, visit our website or contact Jennifer Harrolle at jharrolle@rockford.edu.

Idea:  “There are only three ways to teach a child. The first is by example, the second is by example, the third is by example.” — Albert Schweitzer

See you next time with our digest of new and interesting items in entrepreneurship, ethics, and political economy. Here are the previous editions of CEE Review.

Entrepreneurial Education Conference at Rockford University, March 31-April 1

Thursday, March 16th, 2017

EE 2017 Poster 1The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship will be hosting a conference at Rockford University, March 31-April 1, 2017, on Entrepreneurial Education.

Invited speakers include: T.K. Coleman (Praxis), María Marty (Fundación para la Responsabilidad Intelectual), Nicholas Capaldi (Loyola University New Orleans), Kevin Currie-Knight (East Carolina University), Marsha Familaro Enright (The Great Connections Seminars), Terry Noel (Illinois State University), Jed Hopkins (Edgewood College), Amy Willis (Liberty Fund), and Peggy O’Neil (University of Western Ontario).

Free Registration here. (Refreshments included.)

Theme:

On the Entrepreneurial side of the phrase: We live in entrepreneurial times. From the work demand side, there is increasing proportion of employment within entrepreneurial firms and a slow upward trend in the number of startups. From the work-supply side, younger people of this generation express higher levels of aspiration to start their own businesses or to work within entrepreneurial firms. Increasing globalization and liberalization also mean that the entrepreneurial trends are not only regional or national.

On the Education side: How can we best help younger people become entrepreneurial—either to prepare them for creating their own businesses, or to be entrepreneurial within existing firms, or as freelancing artists, writers, and musicians? If the traditional model of education—students sitting in straight rows of desks and all doing the same work at the same time following the directions of an authority figure—does not prepare students for entrepreneurism, then what should we replace it with?

We also live in a time of dissatisfaction with the dominant forms of education, with many complaints about stagnant or declining outcomes, bureaucratization, demoralization and worse, especially in poorer neighborhoods.

And we live in times of disruptive education technologies—from simple email and online chat to pre-packaged podcasts and video series to robust online MOOCs and more.

Putting all of the above together, how do we answer this question: What should entrepreneurial education look like?Apple-Lightbulb-cutout

Free Registration here. (Refreshments included.)

Here is a PDF of the conference poster containing the conference schedule.

This conference is made possible in part by support from the John Templeton Foundation and the Institute for Humane Studies.

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Al Gini on leadership — our interview (transcript)

Thursday, March 9th, 2017

[Here is a transcript of our eleven-minute video interview.]

Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship Interview with Professor Al Gini on Leadership

Hicks: I’m Stephen Hicks of CEE. Today we have with us Professor Al Gini from Loyola University Chicago, where he is chair of the management department and where he teaches business ethics. He is also associate editor and founding editor of Business Ethics Quarterly. He was here today at Rockford to speak on leadership.

Professor Gini, your theme was organized around ten topics in leadership—ten critical tasks of leadership. I wanted to ask you to speak to three of them that I thought were particularly important. The first one, the number one, top on your list, was leadership and character.

What do you take the character of leaders to be?

Gini: Well, I think that, point of fact, it´s just at the top of the list, it´s that without the list doesn´t go forward, as far as I am concerned. For me, a leader, as every individual, is known by what they value and what they believe in. And so I think that what´s critical in a leader is that we want a person whose character has been attuned to other issues besides self. And when we talk about leaders of character, I think what we are talking about is: what do they value? What do they hold dear? What is important to them? Why do they want the job and what are they willing to do and not willing to do for a job, which is also an important consideration. So, for me, character is about the virtues that an individual possesses and how he or she applies those virtues in the task of leadership.

Hicks: If you were to identify three or four of the top virtues, what would you say those are?

Gini: Well, I think the first one would be to be ‘more selfless than selfish’. The recognition that this job is not about me, recognition that this job is about stewardship. Now, I am very uncomfortable about the word steward, stewardship or servant leadership, because it merely triggers of kind of theological base—shepherd, guardian—that kind of thing, and I don´t mean that. I think steward in the Greek means to be in charge of a household. To be an important agent who is in charge of a household. And so, when I say stewardship, I mean, you´ve been hired to manage this household. And so to me that leader has been hired. This is a job, as Harry Truman said, this is the best job I´ve ever had. But this is job, and my job is to be for others, not simply for myself.

Hicks: So a proper attitude toward self in relation to others, recognizing that there is more to that job, than just focusing. What else, what there will be key character traits of it?

Gini: Well, I think we are talking about certain essences of truth, commitment, work ethic, and how one sees the democratic process. And by democratic process I don´t mean just the American democratic processes. How one deals with followers, how one deals with collaborators, fellow stakeholders. I think that it´s critical.

In that list that I put up, I also talk about knowing oneself. I take that to be part of character. That one of the factors of a good character is they examine oneself. They know what is important to them. They are not easily blindsided by Oh, a new temptation, or a new issue they haven’t thought their way through.

You know, Hemingway once said, defining courage, that courage is a good men in a tough situation, a good person in a tough situation. And he meant by that, that person has already thought through Should I run into that building and save that child or, I guess, I should have a fireperson, but they have already thought that through, and then when the situation comes up, they do it.

So, I think that part of the requirement for leadership is to live the examined life, to be philosophical. Now, one no longer quote Socrates from The Republic, when he says in Book V that no state will be just until all philosophers are kings and all kings are philosophers. I am not sure I want to buy totally into that, but I do like that avenue of approach.

Hicks: So, actually at least to be philosophical, if not philosophers.

Gini: That´s okay, good.

Hicks: A second one that jumped out at me in your list was the importance of vision. That´s a big concept and we hear a lot about it. What is vision and what does it matter ?

Gini: You know, in the 1980s, in George Bush I, how I refer to it, it was the V-word , and he popped it off and became kind of this joke, all the vision of this, the vision of that, it was like the buzzword of the month. What I really think vision is strategic planning goal, and a guide to a company. What do we want to do here? How do we do it? What is our quality control factor? Why do we do it and why do we want to continue doing it, etc., etc.? So I think a vision to me includes strategic plans and tactical plans of getting something done. And I think an effective leader at the political level has to offer a strategic plan and a tactical plan that entices people to vote for them. And I think successful leaders in business need to also implement strategic and tactical plans that make that company successful and make them into successful leaders.

Hicks: What goes into making people able to do that? We talk about intelligence, abstract ability, knowledge?

Gini: Although this isn´t a popular thought, to me a leader has a certain skillset—like an athlete—that simply isn´t given to everyone and can´t totally be trained. You can be exposed to training, but you won´t necessarily get better. Michael Jordan had athletic skill, and then he added to that practice, development, and stretching himself to improve. I don´t have enough athletic skill. If I took the same kinds of lessons and coaching he did, I wouldn´t achieve that. It would be impossible for me to do so. But I´ve taken enough math courses to be acceptable in math, even though I don´t understand numbers as clearly as people who gravitate toward mathematics. So, I think that what we are talking about here is this inner talent that is also being trained.

Now, the whispered question is: are leaders born or made? I think there is a certain talent then is then developed and made better. Clearly, a Nelson Mandela is a perfect example of somebody that was well-trained, he was a lawyer after all, with great experience, and then time to reflect, time to develop, even in prison, it´s a strange thing to say, but really true. He tells us in his writings that it was in prison that I really went to the university of life, that I was able to reflect and talk about these things. So, I think no one is just born a great athlete. You have the skillset, but then has to be directed properly. But I do think there are people who are not leaders, and we´ve met them. That you wouldn´t them to take a group of seven-year olds to the ice-cream store.

Hicks: As you say, you´d never seen them again.

The third one on your list that jumped out at me was teaching. And, in many cases, we think of leaders as just telling people what to do and then they are hands-off. But your account was much more hands-on. So, say a little bit more if you can about the teaching role you think great leaders play.

Gini: Well, you are going to find the draconian leader, you know, you must do this and my will be done or it´s my way or the highway.

But I think the reality is: successful leaders empower their followers. And that word is more used than vision. To empower—that is, convince them that this is worth doing. Convince them that this is important. If you´ve never thought of this idea, let me bring it to your attention, and let me explain why this is important. I want to convert you.

So, I think teaching is a really important skill. To simply give orders, and even if you have an effective staff who obeys orders, is not really getting into the heart of the matter. Again, if leadership is about empowering people to be leaders of their own job, they´ve got to know why they are doing it. They can´t just know these are the four things that I have to do every day and repeat them again, again and again. So, I think they have to see that connection. So, I think good leaders have an obligation to teach people what to do.

When, as parents, when our 5-year olds wouldn´t put under galoshes and raincoats and go off to school, or when they were in the first or second grade, we force them to do it and made them walk out the door. And I am hoping that they recognize it that you can´t afford to get sick, you can´t miss school, you can´t miss a day´s work. But they´ve got make it at their own somewhere down the line, and so when it comes to their own, that is really lived out. And I think it´s the same thing at the workplace. You can only give orders so long. You can´t supervise everybody all the time. They either have to know what they are doing and why they are doing it, or it doesn´t get done.

Hicks: In closing, I want to ask you a historical question. You can do this is as a philosopher, someone who well-versed in literature. In your talk you mentioned this last generation there have been a number of failures of leadership, and then you mentioned a number of individuals in business who were in positions of leadership, people in politics in positions of leadership. And for good reasons, there are lots of widely discussed failures of leadership from both areas. So there is a temptation—it might be a real temptation for us to say—Well, we live in a particularly corrupt, or leadership vacuum, cultural time. But you also quoted Cicero, going back 2,000 years now, reflecting on his age and making the same criticisms about the failures of leadership in his time. Is our age particularly bad? Do you think we´ve made progress? Can we learn from history?

Gini: Well, I think our age is no different than any other age. I mean, the notion that everything happens comes around again. I think that Teapot Dome scandals of the 1920s were recapitulations of Grant’s whiskey scandals and a recapitulation of certain things that happened under Washington, just to use the American experience.

I think scandals come back again and again. We teach Socrates because every generation has to be tooled in literacy and ethics; it´s not inborn. But I don´t think it is any worse. And, in fact, I think the actions of the last number of years—that we got to this new electronic revolution, for all its downside, that we are tethered to our talking machines and our computers, and that we are changing the face of the universe.

What is happening in Egypt right now and in Northern Africa right now, is a demonstration that people want effective, democratic, transparent leadership. Leaders who are committed to the people that are in charge of and lead, and that just seem that they are there by virtue of office and by virtue of custom tradition.

And so, in a very real sense, I think we are moving into a much more democratic, critical awareness of leadership and that leaders will be held to a much higher account.

Hicks: So you are an optimist.

Gini: Yes, I am an optimist right now.

Hicks: Thanks for being with us.

Gini: A pleasure to be with you.

[end]

CEE Review: What happens when doctors only take cash | The world’s most innovative economies, and more

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017

News and Opinion

doctor-bannerEntrepreneurs—Not Coal Or Factories—Will Save The Middle-American Economy. Fast Company.

What Happens When Doctors Only Take Cash. Time.

Are Non-Compete Clauses Ethical? Business Ethics Highlights.

Innovations in customer service at McDonald’s. Fortune.

New methods of online advertising fraud. CNN.

CLP-brain-vector-shutter-stockThese Are the World’s Most Innovative Economies. Bloomberg.

How Michael Dubin Turned a Funny Video Into $1 Billion. The Wall Street Journal.

Ultra Spiritual Guy has this amusing send-up of entrepreneurial cliches. YouTube.

Why the human brain is our most precious commodity. HumanProgress.org.

Announcements

FB_IMG_1478352567560Stephen Hicks’s Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault has been translated into and published in Polish. Stephen gave a lecture tour in Poland in January coinciding with the publishing of the translation. Read more about the lecture tour at our site.

Idea: “Birds born in a cage think flying is an illness.” — Alejandro Jodorowski

See you next time with our digest of new and interesting items in entrepreneurship, ethics, and political economy. Here are the previous editions of CEE Review.