The CEE Web Log

CEE Review: Income immobility | Brazil’s bribery scandal | No free dentistry for the poor | and more

News and Opinion

It’s not the income inequality: It’s the income immobility. Tyler Cowen in The New York Times.

Africa-workoutAfrican progress data. Max Roser at Africa in Data.

Starbucks invests in its employees: $250 Million for Free 4-Year College For Every Employee. Forbes.

How Brazil’s ‘Nine Horsemen’ Cracked a Bribery Scandal. The Wall Street Journal.

Richard Lorenc profiles Steve Jobs. Foundation for Economic Education.

Here are must-attend conferences in 2015 for tech entrepreneurs. At innov8ive.

“Are We Too Wicked for Freedom?” Stephen Hicks at The Good Life.

Hiroko Tabuchi on the second B corporation to go public: “Etsy I.P.O. Tests Pledge to Balance Social Mission and Profit.” The New York Times.dentist

Government Tells Philanthropist Dentist He Can’t Charge Lower Prices for Poor People. Institute for Justice.

JP Morgan has spent $36 billion on legal matters since the financial crisis. So it has developed surveillance algorithms to identify rogue employees before they go astray. Bloomberg.

Idea: “I cannot give you the formula for success, but I can give you the formula for failure, which is: Try to please everybody.” Herbert Swope

See you next time with our digest of new and interesting items in entrepreneurship, ethics, and political economy. Here are the previous editions of CEE Review.

*Steve Jobs and Philosophy* published by Shawn Klein

Klein-Jobs-coverAnew book, Steve Jobs and Philosophy, edited by CEE’s Shawn E. Klein, is now published and available in bookstores and online.

Dr. Klein has assembled sixteen essays on Steve Jobs’s impact. Here is Klein’s summary:

“Jobs was an outstanding achiever and a complex man with serious faults. This book is neither demonization nor hagiography. It is not intended as indictment or apology. The chapters are thoughtful, mostly philosophical, examinations, from different points of view, of Steve Jobs’s life and work, and their impact on our culture and the way we live.”

CEE’s Stephen Hicks contributed an essay entitled “How Can We Make Entrepreneurs?”

The book is part of Open Court Publishing’s Popular Culture and Philosophy series. Here is the Amazon link for more information.

CEE Review: Street-Selling | Panama’s significance | Hand-made and hi-tech | Fake peer review, and more

News and Opinion

What foreign language should entrepreneurs learn to best connect in a globalizing economy? The Economist.

Male nurses make more money than female nurses. The Wall Street Journal.

tehran-sugar-beet-vendor“Street-selling is the poor man’s entrepreneurship.” From Iran, Mohamad Machine-Chian reflects on the fate of 31-year-old street fruit-dealer Youness Asakere whose stand was confiscated by the authorities. The Savvy Street.

In The New York Times, Gretchen Morgenstern on Fannie, Freddie, and the Treasury Department: A flood of cash and silence after the housing crisis.

Handmade and high-tech: “In Bolivia, highly skilled knitters have been enlisted to knit heart plugs for kids with holes in their hearts. At a clinic in La Paz, the women sit in a clean medical room and knit tiny, delicate occluders — medical devices for people who suffer from the congenital heart defect known as patent ductus arteriosis. These nimble-fingered women knit the occluders in under two hours with a single metal strand made of an alloy called nitinol.” More at Good magazine.

Fake peer review, “possibly involving third-party companies selling the service,” leads to the retraction of 43 papers from a science journal. Retraction Watch.

panama-thirdKevin Bryan of the University of Toronto on Joel Mokyr’s thesis about innovation and the Industrial Revolution.

Surse Pierpoint on Panama’s economic significance — the Canal and the Free Trade Zone. Charleston College of Business channel at YouTube.

Related: CEE’s Kaizen interview with Pierpoint on Entrepreneurial Logistics in Panama.

Announcements

Professor Irfan Khawaja announces the extensive program for the Ninth Annual Conference of the Felician Institute for Ethics and Public Affairs, to be held on April 25, 2015 at the Felician College Rutherford Campus in New Jersey.

The Association for Private Enterprise Education has its 40th annual meeting in mid-April in Cancun. Stephen Hicks will be presenting two papers, one on “Social Virtues for Individualists” and one on “Corruption in Business — Does Regulation Lessen It or Make It Worse?”

Call for Papers for the 19th Scientific Conference on Ethics in Economic Life, to be held in Lodz, Poland.

Idea: “Great leaders are almost always great simplifiers, who can cut through argument, debate, and doubt to offer a solution everybody can understand.” Colin Powell

And check out Anna Vital’s graphic on serial entrepreneurs’ multiple paths to success (click to enlarge):
Vital-Anna-serial-entrepreneurs-pursue-multiple-opportunities

See you next time with our digest of new and interesting items in entrepreneurship, ethics, and political economy. Here are the previous editions of CEE Review.

CEE Review: Chinese free trade | Music entrepreneur advice | Chicago closes incubator | and more

News and Opinion

Guangdong-FTZ-2China greenlights plans for Guangdong Free Trade Zone. CCTV.

Cool technology: Parking your bike in Japan. YouTube.

Designing private cities, open to all. Alex Tabarrok and Shruti Rajagopalan in The New York Times.

Super Soaker Creator Receives $72.9M in Unpaid Royalties From Hasbro.

Global Entrepreneurship Week: Poland Wins Country of the Year.

earth-headphonesFor music entrepreneurs: Survival in the Age of Spotify. MIT Technology Review.

Chicago bureaucrats put Zina Murray’s innovative entrepreneurship incubator out of business. Institute for Justice on YouTube.

Professor Alexei Marcoux’s invited lecture to the College of Charleston School of Business: “Why Entrepreneurship Matters: Economically, Politically, and Morally”. YouTube.

Idea: “It is absurd that a man should rule others, who cannot rule himself. (Absurdum est ut alios regat, qui seipsum regere nescit.)” Latin Proverb

IAmEntrepreneur

Dr. Carrie-Ann Biondi to speak at Rockford University

biondi-carrie-annDr. Carrie-Ann Biondi of Marymount Manhattan College will be speaking on “Mike Rowe and Ayn Rand: Somebody’s Gotta Do It.”

According to Professor Shawn Klein, who is organizing the talk, Dr. Biondi’s focus is actor Mike Rowe of “Dirty Jobs” and “Somebody’s Gotta Do It” and what those television programs show about productiveness as a virtue.

“There is no such thing as clean or dirty work, but rather work done either well or poorly.”

Rowe,Mike-Dirty-JobsDr. Biondi won Marymount Manhattan’s teaching excellence award in 2012. A video of her acceptance speech is here.

Time: April 2.
Location: Rockford University campus (map here).

Professor Biondi’s talk is sponsored by the Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and is open to all interested parties.

CEE Review: Art entrepreneurship | Incentives and racism | New books on Steve Jobs | and more

News and Opinion

A focus on the Art world:

impressionist-galleryEntrepreneurship and art: The dealer who made the Impresssionists. The Guardian.

Politics and art: Camille Paglia on How Capitalism Can Save Art: “I am speaking as a libertarian Democrat who voted for Barack Obama.” The Wall Street Journal.

Economics and art: Franklin Einspruch requests: “Art People: Learn Economics, I Beseech You.” Artblog.net.

Philosophy and art: “Taking Modern Artists at Their Word.” Stephen Hicks at The Good Life.

Being the artist of your own life and reinventing oneself, no matter what one’s age. The New York Times.

And in other areas:

Pitching to investors: The only 10 slides you need. Entrepreneur magazine.

Sandy Ikeda on economic incentives and racism: Trading with “The Other” — can mutual benefit overcome racism?. Foundation for Economic Education.

A report on Puerto Rico’s economy in 2015 with recommendations for reform. National Puerto Rican Chamber of Commerce.

Hair-braiders in eight states, Arkansas now included, can now operate legally. Institute for Justice.

How we moved decisively from entrepreneurial laissez-faire to central planning, the case of Britain: economic historian Daniel Ritschel’s “We are All Planners Now.” Abstract at Oxford Scholarship Online.

At Inc. magazine: seven new books on Steve Jobs, including one from CEE’s Shawn Klein. Steve Jobs and Philosophy (2015):
Klein-Jobs-coverWhy It’s Intriguing: This soon-to-be-published book contains reflections of 16 contemporary philosophers on the life of Steve Jobs and the effect that he’s had on modern society.
Best Quote: “Jobs was an outstanding achiever and a complex man with serious faults. This book is neither demonization nor hagiography. It is not intended as indictment or apology. The chapters are thoughtful, mostly philosophical, examinations, from different points of view, of Steve Jobs’s life and work, and their impact on our culture and the way we live.”

Idea: “My job is not to be easy on people. My job is to take these great people we have and to push them and make them even better.” Steve Jobs

See you next time with our digest of new and interesting items in entrepreneurship, ethics, and political economy. Here are the previous editions of CEE Review.

CEE Review: Against paternalism | Factory Asia | Cultural trust | Cronyist incentives, and more

News and Opinion

Youth entrepreneurship: Harlem Teen Raises $30,000 Without Investors to Start a Business the World Has Never Seen. NextShark.

china-manufacturingFactory Asia. The Economist feature on China’s rise to manufacturing dominance and its likelihood of staying there.

American exceptionalism: individualism, optimism, and religion. Pew Research.

Professor Richard Ebeling on survey results: Americans See Big Corruption in Big Business. EpicTimes.

Cronyist incentives in the mixed economy: Give politicians control over business, and businesses will then “invest” in politicians. $1 gives $760 ROI.

Grégoire Canlorbe interviews Paul H. Rubin on dominance and productive hierarchies. Institut Coppet.

Against paternalism: “On Intelligence, Freedom, and Who Knows What’s Best for You”. Stephen Hicks at The Good Life.trust

How institutions generate norms of trust. Abstract of Cassar, d’Adda, and Grosjean’s paper in the Journal of Law and Economics.

Idea: “The leaders who offer blood, toil, tears and sweat always get more out of their followers than those who offer safety and a good time. When it comes to the pinch, human beings are heroic.” George Orwell

See you next time with our digest of new and interesting items in entrepreneurship, ethics, and political economy. Here are the previous editions of CEE Review.

CEE Review: Work-life balance | Gender quotas | Millennials underperform | and more

News and Opinion

work-life-balance-multiWork-life balance: Google’s CFO is retiring early to spend more time with family. Really. The New York Times.

Chris Matthews on “The myth of the 1% and the 99%” and “why aren’t Americans taking to the streets?” Fortune.

Rebecca Strauss: “There is no question that the US is far more regulated than it used to be — regulations have been growing steadily in number for decades under both Democratic and Republican presidents. … But while regulatory burden is up, it’s still lower than in nearly every other country on earth.” So does the US need fewer regulations or smarter regulations? (Or both?) Quartz.

Sharp practices in Chinese e-commerce: “Merchants use fake orders, shell storefronts to gain prominence.” The Wall Street Journal.

“Why we should all be thrilled about the FDA starting to embrace innovation.” Vivek Wadhwa in The Washington Post.

Germany Sets Gender Quota in the Boardroom. The New York Times.norway-quota

Related: “The Impact on Firm Valuation of Mandated Female Board Representation.” In the Quarterly Journal of Economics, Kenneth Ahrens and Amy Dittmer assess the results of Norway’s 2003 law mandating 40% female representation on boards.

Work to do: American millennials are among the world’s least skilled. Fortune.

Related: Millennials in America are atrocious at math — and not great at reading, either. Washington Post.

“The United States of Corporate Welfare”: Which company got the most targeted tax breaks, subsidies, and grants in the state where you live? Reason.

“Two Cheers for Corruption.” Deirdre McCloskey reviews two books for The Wall Street Journal.

Anna Vital’s graphical history of opportunity. Click to enlarge. Vital-AnnaHistory-of-opportunity

See you next time with our digest of new and interesting items in entrepreneurship, ethics, and political economy. Here are the previous editions of CEE Review.

CEE Review: Dolls teach entrepreneurship | Corrupting Hong Kong | Food carts | and more

News and Opinion

american_girl_parisAmerican Girl Dolls and teaching girls entrepreneurship. Iowa City Press Citizen.

Entrepreneurial urban farming in Boston. PBS.

Temporal misallocation: “Chinese construction boom wastes resources on a massive scale.” Daniil Gorbatenko at the Atlas Network.

Uber and the jitneys. Sarah Skwire on old and new transportation technology. Foundation for Economic Education.

“Claudia Perez is 62 years old. She was born in Mexico, but came to the United States in 1995.” How Chicago makes her food-cart business illegal. Hilary Gowins in Huffington Post.

hong-kong1An article in Constitutional Political Economy on Hong Kong’s transition: Eric Ip argues that HK is becoming a “partisan social engineer and economic gamesman, thereby unleashing skyrocketing rent-seeking opportunities.” Springer.

“Are You Smart Enough to Live in a Free Society?” Stephen Hicks at The Good Life.

Idea: “The best strategists aren’t intimidated or paralyzed by uncertainty and ambiguity; they are creative enough to imagine possibilities that may or may not actually exist and are willing to try a course of action knowing full well that it will have to be tweaked or even overhauled entirely as events unfold.
“The essential qualities for this type of person are flexibility, imagination, and resilience. But there is no evidence that these qualities are correlated with pure intelligence.social-media-strategy-192 In fact, the late organizational learning scholar Chris Argyris argued the opposite in his classic HBR article ‘Teaching Smart People How to Learn.’ In his study of strategy consultants, Argyris found that smart people tend to be more brittle. They need both to feel right and to have that correctness be validated by others. When either or both fail to occur, smart people become defensive and rigidly so.” Roger Martin at Harvard Business Review.

See you next time with our digest of new and interesting items in entrepreneurship, ethics, and political economy. Here are the previous editions of CEE Review.

CEE Review: Gen X entrepreneurism | Is corruption unavoidable | Arts education, entrepreneurially

News and Opinion

David Post on how the net-neutrality debates became a separation of powers story. Washington Post.gen-x-online-shopping-563

Can a businessman stay clean in a corrupt world? Kurt Keefner reviews the movie A Most Violent Year.

Isaac Morehouse on obedience, entitlement, and categorizing the entrepreneurism of Generation X.

Polish chemistry-education entrepreneurship: The wildly-popular Professor Why.

How tax policy affects startups. Kaufmann.

Economies of scale make regulatory compliance easier for big firms. So small firms are disproportionately damaged. How community banks in the US have been negatively impacted. Harvard Kennedy School Working Papers.

Why Government Fails So Often–and How It Can Do Better. Michael Munger reviews Peter Schuck’s book.sculpting-bad

Can entrepreneurship save arts education? Michael Luchies reflects at LinkedIn.

Timothy Sandefur on another barrier to entrepreneurship: Certificate of Need licenses.

“Is Racial Tolerance the Best We Can Do?” Stephen Hicks at The Good Life.

Announcements

Mercatus Center announces a series of conversations with economist Tyler Cowen. His first guests will be Peter Thiel and Jeffrey Sachs.

22nd Annual International Vincentian Business Ethics Conference (IVBEC) will take place at the New York Marriott Downtown, New York City, 22-24 October 2015. Call for papers.steven_spielberg_et

Idea: “I don’t dream at night, I dream all day, I dream for a living.” (Steven Spielberg)

See you next time with our digest of new and interesting items in entrepreneurship, ethics, and political economy. Here are the previous editions of CEE Review.