Warning: mysql_real_escape_string() [function.mysql-real-escape-string]: Access denied for user 'ceeweb'@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/ceeweb/public_html/wp-content/plugins/statpress/statpress.php on line 1191

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string() [function.mysql-real-escape-string]: A link to the server could not be established in /home/ceeweb/public_html/wp-content/plugins/statpress/statpress.php on line 1191

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string() [function.mysql-real-escape-string]: Access denied for user 'ceeweb'@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/ceeweb/public_html/wp-content/plugins/statpress/statpress.php on line 1194

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string() [function.mysql-real-escape-string]: A link to the server could not be established in /home/ceeweb/public_html/wp-content/plugins/statpress/statpress.php on line 1194

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string() [function.mysql-real-escape-string]: Access denied for user 'ceeweb'@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/ceeweb/public_html/wp-content/plugins/statpress/statpress.php on line 1197

Warning: mysql_real_escape_string() [function.mysql-real-escape-string]: A link to the server could not be established in /home/ceeweb/public_html/wp-content/plugins/statpress/statpress.php on line 1197
Interview with Krzysztof Jurek on Entrepreneurship in Poland » Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship
 

Interview with Krzysztof Jurek on Entrepreneurship in Poland

[This is the full interview with Krzysztof Jurek which was published in our Kaizen newsletter.]

Krzysztof Jurek on Entrepreneurship in Poland

Krzysztof Jurek is CEO of Logon SA, Logonet, Ltd. and LED Lighting Poland, as well as the President of the Bydgoszcz IT cluster, an association of IT companies and universities in central Poland. He’s also a board member of Pracodawcy Pomorza i Kujaw, a local employers’ union with 270 entities and is actively involved with Faith and Light.

Kaizen: Where were you raised?

Jurek: I was born in Bydgoszcz, Poland in the 1960s. When I was in school, it became pretty clear to my family that I had a thing for science, mathematics, physics, and playing chess with my grandmother’s brother who would reminisce about the war. These were the things I enjoyed. I would also dismantle things and put them back together.

I studied electronics in high school. It was also at that time that I learned to really be with people and became more open. It was mainly related to youth religious communities (the Oasis Movement).

In the years 1980-1986, I studied engineering at the University of Gdańsk. I was engaged in charity work at the same time. After my graduation I decided that I would like to do something that would combine my interests and allow me to do some good. This is why I applied to medical university.

Kaizen: When you were a child did you expect to be an entrepreneur?

Jurek: Definitely not. I didn’t think about entrepreneurship during my childhood, and I didn’t think about it even after I started working as an employee. I thought about finding an interesting job and devoting myself to other social activities.

Besides, there weren’t many private companies in Poland at that time. Small farmers, gardeners, and craftsman were the only entrepreneurs. I didn’t even think that I could become some kind of manager. My idea of a career was to work as an engineer on the technical side of things. However, everyday reality in communist Poland was, to some extent, a preparation course for being an entrepreneur. People had to make so many things on their own with very limited access to materials. It allowed them to develop creativity and independence.

I spent my childhood in communist Poland. What it meant for us was that our country remained under the Soviet Union’s control, and because of that freedom, private property, and enterprise were virtually nonexistent. There was no free speech, and you weren’t allowed to say what you thought. However, 1980, which is when I was in college, brought about some big changes. It was a big spring in Poland with the great Solidarity movement and the victory without violence. There were strikes, but there was no talk about free enterprise yet. Civil rights and freedom were often mentioned during these protests. Unfortunately, martial law was introduced in 1981, and the Communist regime stopped all of that. The Polish economy really struggled until 1989. In 1988, the government had introduced “Wilczek’s law,” which included business-friendly regulation. The Polish Round Table talks and negotiations between the Communists and the opposition, which had the support of the nation’s population, radically changed everything. That year Poland got to partially free elections.

Kaizen: Why did you decide to become an entrepreneur instead of working in an already established company?

Jurek: I like challenges, and entrepreneurship allows me to be creative and independent. Also, I find it easier to devote more of my time to work when I know that I work for myself.

On the other hand, I have to deal with high risk and responsibility, and you can’t just quit when things go wrong.

Kaizen: When did you start?

Jurek: We founded our company in 1991.

Kaizen: How did you make your first steps?

Jurek: After I graduated from college I went to a medical university, and I was able to organize a little IT cell there. In the meantime, Poland had changed and people were finally able to found their own companies. My friends from university had an idea, and they talked me into going into business with them. What convinced me was that I knew this industry very well. They just wanted to try this new thing, but I really got into it and tried to solve problems as well as I could. After a while I quit my job at the university.

My partners decided to keep their jobs, so I bought their shares.

Kaizen: What is the importance of business planning?

Jurek: When we were starting out we didn’t have any specific plans. We just knew that we would do something related to IT. We thought, let’s try to do something, and we will see how things go. After all, there is little risk here.

Even after all this time I am still a bad role model when it comes to planning things out. I am self-taught, which means that over time I developed a certain system that allows me to verify my plans and adapt to the current situation. I think it might result from the nature of the IT industry, as it is changing all the time. Very often, I use simple cost-and-risk planning as a substitute for more comprehensive blueprints. It is close to agile project management.

Kaizen: How much research and planning did you do?

Jurek: There was no need for research and planning when we were starting out. We didn’t even know what an entrepreneur really does, so we had to learn everything from the scratch; bureaucracy, law—we were finding out about these things step by step. Our first tax audit was very enlightening.

That being said, so many things are based on intuition and using common sense to create new rules. Even these days I try to make some kind of first step or a test before every major project.

Kaizen: How did you raise the initial money?

Jurek: It was all bootstrapped from the start. I had a job at my university that paid a modest salary and supported us for a short while.

We saved as much capital as we could, and after some time banks introduced reasonably priced loans.

There were a few merger or buyout proposals in the meantime, but none of them materialized. I have always been very cautious about going public, as it would mean taking responsibility for investors’ money.

Kaizen: How important is belief in yourself and your product?

Jurek: It really helps. Customers and business partners want to work with someone who is convinced about his or her product. But when this conviction is not real and made up just for marketing purposes, it might have an opposite outcome.

Kaizen: About salesmanship—how do you get past the awkwardness?

Jurek: Not everyone is a salesman, but it is a very useful skillset. Putting yourself in the customers’ shoes and putting in a genuine effort to solve their problems might be really helpful. You have to understand their needs, and when you are competitive and have fun solving these problems it is even better.

There are so many things that you just can’t learn from a lecture. Some corporations undergo sales training where salesman are taught that it is good to be honest, fair, and to respect your customer, but at the same time people who clean their offices are treated like objects. In my company, both my employees and I say good morning to cleaning ladies.

Kaizen: What has been your biggest challenge and how did you overcome it?

Jurek: Finding a balance between my professional and private life. Passion requires great commitments, and it is important not to ignore uneasiness that arises when you neglect your family. It is in these moments when you have to fix things and compensate for it.

Kaizen: How do you recover from setbacks?

Jurek: This is touching a little bit on psychology and psychological resistance. What works for me is to distance myself from the materialistic side of things and to try to patch things up when I have done something wrong. Sometimes you just have to let things happen their own way. That being said, I found that often setbacks are what motivates me and helps me focus on my work.

Kaizen: How do you maintain your optimism when times are tough or you’re facing disappointments?

Jurek: You need something apart from your company. Something that gives you a strong foundation in these changing times. For me this is my family and my faith. Moreover, I am fortunate to have people in my company that I can depend on. Also, going to work on a bicycle throughout the year, in all weather, has been one of my small pleasures.

Kaizen: How important is the value of perseverance?

Jurek: Perseverance is very important. Every project is bound to encounter problems, and only by tackling them are we able to move forward. My colleagues often come to me with different ideas. Regardless of whether are we pursuing them or not they just keep coming in with new ideas. This is when I tell them, “Let’s do something; let’s focus on execution. We won’t achieve anything by simply thinking about new ideas. We need to take action and be persistent.”

Kaizen: Not all successful entrepreneurs are also able to manage larger businesses. What additional or supplemental skills do you see as necessary?

Jurek: It is very common among small business owners to treat a company as if it was their wallet. It is important to distinguish between your assets and your company’s assets. Even when you own your business, you need to set some boundaries.

Of course, you also need the ability to delegate work, cooperate, and define rules that are clear for everyone.

Kaizen: What about the temptation to compromise?

Jurek: I am not a guy who sets tough goals and tries to achieve them at any cost. I like to have fun doing what I do. It is style that is more important to me. This approach also provides challenges. It would be a compromise to give someone a bribe. It would be taking an easy way, doing something I do not enjoy. I think it is far better to be uncompromising.

Kaizen: How do you think about your role as a leader?

Jurek: Even when, in theory, you decide to take a teamwork route, it is easier when there are leaders around. Sometimes I would prefer to avoid it, but there is a need for a certain hierarchy. On the other hand, mature leadership means pulling back at the right moment and letting others develop.

You can build your authority in many different ways, from a position of strength, your competence, or relationships.

Leadership should be natural. What I mean by that is working together with your team, not running away from problems, and being an example of commitment. When it comes to me, I try to understand most of the processes that go on in my company, all the way from accounting to technical solutions.

Kaizen: What is your greatest reward your business accomplishments have brought you?

Jurek: You can perceive my company as a kind of tangible creation, which you can either be happy about or be dissatisfied that it has not developed more.

In 2016, a regional newspaper chose me as the manager of the year in the voivodeship. I really like what I do even though I have to deal with very serious problems. On the one hand I appreciate huge independence, but on the other hand I must deal with the consequences.

Kaizen: How have you managed to fit or balance your career goals with other life goals, e.g., relationships and family?

Jurek: Eventually I managed to find a balance, although it was not always easy. I regret a lot of moments, especially when the children were little and I was consumed by the company. There were times when I had to send a replacement to school when the parents’ presence was required because I was busy with a meeting or an official trip.

We have five children. I feel happy about them, and I am also connected with my family. My wife was at the same time understanding and fighting for my time for the family. She was not giving up. For a long time we were leading a support group for mentally ill. Someone could say that it was just a waste of time, but for us it was a source of experiences which gave us perspective on ourselves and the work. It can be said that those experiences helped us to get through.

Kaizen: Are there special challenges for entrepreneurship in Poland?

Jurek: In a lot of industries, the domestic market is so big that we don’t have to think about exports even though we should. We manufacture many products which are sold under foreign brands. We could really use more Polish brands. The location of Poland gives us a lot of opportunities. We also have well-educated youth. What is more, people are hard-working.

Kaizen: Now that Poland is much more open, how has its relation to western Europe changed?

Jurek: Many years ago, when Poles went to Germany they admired the houses in small towns—so tidy and trim. Today we have more beautiful ones in our country. We do not need anything but more freedom and equal opportunities. Poles, in the majority, are hard working and very flexible. We can adapt to a new environment very quickly.

Our first governments in the nineties got excited about the idea of a liberal market but opened the unprepared market too fast. Thus, our banks were quickly taken over by foreign banks. Foreign supermarkets were opened, where foreign products are warmly welcomed while our regional products were not. Freeing Polish enterprises from our government’s influence came with selling our national telecommunications monopolist to co-partnership France Telecom, controlled by the French Government.

Our apparent free market isn’t entirely free. When selling Polish products to Germany or France one encounters many difficulties. In the industries that we are very good at there are many restrictions. In other industrial branches, we are colonized.

Despite having a common market, western markets are more protected than ours.

Kaizen: Is it overall a positive?

Jurek: There are more advantages of this opening than drawbacks, but it could have been done better.

Nevertheless, we are happy to be a part of Europe, as we have many relationships and economic connections. Finally, we have a normal, humane relationship with the Germans! We can travel freely. In winter, on Italian or Austrian slopes, Poles are often the most numerous foreign group.

Also, Poland is the sixth largest European country by population and has the fourth largest number of students (after Germany, France, and Italy), so we have much potential.

Kaizen: What do you think of Poland’s relation to Russia and the east, given the long, complicated history there?

Jurek: Many people from Ukraine live, work, or study in my city. Poland supported the independence of Ukraine, and we paid for that through the nose. We produce excellent food, but in Russia its harmfulness was immediately descried. As a result, we were forbidden to export. We suffered huge losses but we can handle it. For example, colleagues who produce apples found new trade areas in Arabic countries.

When on the 9th of June, 2006, Poles bought a refinery in Lithuania, Russians, who also felt inclined to buy it, were trying to make us back out of it. On the 26th of July they announced a failure of a pipeline delivering the raw material, and for ten years nothing can be fixed. In the meantime, they have built a new pipeline with Germany through the Baltic Sea, and that enabled the attack on Ukraine.

Personally, I don’t have much experience with Russia. My colleagues are trading with them. Lately on a congress I engaged myself in a conversation with a Russian. At the beginning it was quite interesting, but when we were discussing freedom of speech and information in Russia he started to divagate about different countenances of truth.

In contacts with Russians, Poles are torn. We do understand Russia and their history. We have a lot in common, and we also like them. But at the same time, we regret their attitude towards hypocrisy and obvious propaganda, which they acknowledge as their own opinion. Such phenomena are present all over the world, even in Poland, but in Russia they seem to be escalated. Thus, we have ups and downs, but we also are able to do business with each other independently from the governments’ help. The development of contacts with Belarus is also noticeable.

Kaizen: Does increasing globalization present more opportunities or more challenges for Poland?

Jurek: Globalization means that we use the same technology, watch the same movies, and we have similar knowledge and opportunities.

Once I was going by ferry from Sweden to Estonia. I looked at a window, and I saw the letters “Bohamet.” It turns out my client, who is almost a neighbor, is the world’s leader in ship’s window production. There is a well-developed industry of plastics in my city. Many plastic elements in cars all over the world are manufactured here. These are examples of taking advantage of the opportunities. There are a lot of such examples of taking part in global technologies.

Friends of my children work in the big Intel development center in Gdańsk. Here in Bydgoszcz, almost one thousand people work for Nokia (formerly Lucent).

At the same time, the quick access to all information provided by globalization can also paralyze development. Whenever you create something or figure something out, you check on the internet and find that somebody has already done it. You lose your motivation to try and to gain new experiences.

Kaizen: What projects are you working on next?

Jurek: In my city, Bydgoszcz, IT companies ensure about seven thousand workplaces. We succeeded in creating a cluster of companies, that is, an association of companies cooperating with each other of which I am the chairman. Lately, we boosted our cooperation with universities to increase IT specialists’ education. The project is based on the cooperation of two universities and businesses.

Kaizen: What do you think is the role of passion and dreams in entrepreneurship?

Jurek: Creating anything requires a lot of work and energy from the creator. Passion and dreams are very good sources of energy. These factors let us accomplish more than it could be expected during the phase of creation. However, passion is not only assigned to entrepreneurs. Earlier, when I was designing computer programs, I was equally engaged.

Kaizen: What is the best advice you’ve been given?

In the first years of my company, during a bad economic situation, a partner from China visited us. He pointed out that the economic situation will not last eternally and that it is the natural sine wave; sometimes it is better and sometimes it is not. Here is his advice: Even if the business goes perfectly, get ready for worse times.

Kaizen: What is the most important piece of advice you would give to new entrepreneurs?

Jurek: Other people’s advice can be heard but is rarely taken, especially when you become independent. For fresh entrepreneurs, maybe this: Adjust consumption not to one’s needs and whims but to the possibilities of making money. If I see a new entrepreneur who starts his or her activity with buying a luxury car on account, I keep a great distance. I encourage young people to collect various life experiences and to be active both professionally and extra-professionally.


This interview was conducted for Kaizen by Stephen Hicks. For more information about Mr. Jurek and Logon, please visit the company’s website© 2017.

More Kaizen interviews with leading entrepreneurs are here at our site.

Be Sociable, Share!

Leave a Reply