Archive for July, 2013

The Frontier of Diagnostic Medicine, Business without Bosses, Interns Sue over Wages, Advice from Elite Entrepreneurs, Entrepreneurial Education, Explaining Postmodernism

Friday, July 26th, 2013

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Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

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The Frontier of Diagnostic Medicine
iknife New developments in medical technology are paving the way for longer, healthier lives. In this article, Ray Kurzweil discusses the iKnife, which uses an electrical current to diagnose cancer. And this article explains how the use of “smart” pills to monitor everything “from your vitals to blood flow to temperature in real time” could be mainstream as early as 2014..
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Business without Bosses
PGreenIn this interview, Paul Green, Jr. from the Morning Star Self-Management Institute explains Morning Star’s innovative business model that focuses on self-responsibility and self-management over bureaucracies and bosses. According to Green, this model is premised on “a principle that basically states: to the degree people do all that they agree to do, and don’t initiate force against others or their property, happiness and prosperity will emerge.” Read more about Morning Star’s business vision..

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Interns Sue Over Wages
money-bags3Historically, unpaid internships have offered college students invaluable on-the-job training and education. However, in two recent cases, interns have filed lawsuits for lack of payment against the companies that provided them with internships. This article details the lawsuits against Condé Nast and NBC Universal. Read the complaint against NBC Universal.

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New Chapter from Audiobook Version of Explaining Postmodernism
explaining postmodernismThe sixth and final chapter from Stephen Hicks’s Explaining Postmodernism audiobook has been released. In this chapter, “Postmodern Strategy,” Hicks discusses Rorty’s, Foucault’s, and Derrida’s contribution to postmodernist strategy — and its political implications: “Why has a leading segment of the political Left adopted skeptical and relativist epistemological strategies?”

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Advice from Elite Entrepreneurs
Entrepreneur MindYou should put your job before your family. You should disregard your passion in favor of practicality. These unusual-sounding pieces of advice come from some of the most successful entrepreneurs in the world. In his new book, The Entrepreneur Mind, serial entrepreneur Kevin D. Johnson outlines 100 essential beliefs, insights, and habits of serious entrepreneurs. Read 10 gems from the book in this Forbes article.

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An Online Master’s Degree in Computer Science?
online-degreeThe Georgia Institute of Technology has created a solution to America’s shortage of computer-science experts. According to this Wall Street Journal article, Georgia Tech is now offering an online master’s degree in computer science. This new offering not only allows more people to participate in the degree program, but it costs students just a quarter of the cost of a typical degree.

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See you in two weeks!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.


Wearable Technology, Regulators vs. Mom Entrepreneur, Quantifying Regulation, Hayek on Intellectuals and Nazis, Solving Mankind’s Biggest Problems, (Breast) Feeding Frenzy

Friday, July 12th, 2013

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Kaizen Weekly Review highlights activities of The Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship and recent business ethics and entrepreneurship news.
Editor
: Virginia Murr

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Fashion Meets Technology
13-GoogleGlassModel_1_620x465Technology is quickly becoming a fashion statement. A short list of trendy technologies include: Apple iWatch, Apple smart shoes, Google Glass, Nike+ FuelBand, and LUMOback, an 8.55 mm-thick sensor worn on a belt around the waist that wirelessly tracks movement and activity. Read more about the latest developments in wearable technology.

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Volunteers Not Allowed
Rhea Lana ToysRhea Lana Riner, entrepreneur and mother of three, created a consignment business that uses an innovative business model: Customers at rented pop-up locations could volunteer to set up the sale in exchange for dibs on shopping. This new model caught the attention of the Department of Labor, which decided that Riner’s volunteers should be treated as employees. Has Riner treated her customers unfairly? Or is Riner being “stifled by outmoded dictates?” Read the article.

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Quantifying Regulation at the Mercatus Center
CHP_Commerce_Trade_BooksDetermined to change the flawed methodologies in most statistics on government regulation, Patrick A. McLaughlin, Omar Al-Ubaydli, and the Mercatus Center at George Mason University have developed RegData, “the first tool to allow for industry-specific quantification of federal regulation, permitting within-industry and between-industry analyses of the causes and effects of federal regulations.”

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Hayek on Intellectuals and the Nazis
hayek-1 In this post, Stephen Hicks looks at Friedrich Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom, which was published at the height of World War II. Hicks points out that the intellectual activism of such socialist thinkers as Werner Sombart, Johann Plenge, Friedrich Nauman, Paul Lensch, Moeller van den Bruck, and Oswald Spengler caused Hayek to believe that “Germany’s brightest minds developed the theory and laid the cultural groundwork for the Nazi political transformation.”

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We are Solving Mankind’s Biggest Problems
Abundance_book_cover-212x299In this article, the Atlas Society’s Edward Hudgins reviews two books: Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think by Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler, and Merchants of Despair: Radical Environmentalists, Criminal Pseudo-Scientists, and the Fatal Cult of Antihumanism by Robert Zubrin. While each book takes a different approach, Hudgins concludes that both “offer us components for a new Enlightenment synthesis that can usher in profound cultural changes well beyond the particulars in the pages of these books.”

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(Breast) Feeding Frenzy at the University of Virginia
Paul Tudor JonesHow difficult is it for women to combine high-powered careers with motherhood? Paul Tudor Jones, a hedge fund manager and donor to the University of Virginia, recently incited the opposition of media outlets, the Provost, and 82 faculty members. At a panel discussion on financial trading at the University’s McIntire School of Commerce, Jones stated, “[I]t is difficult for mothers to be successful traders because connecting with a child is a focus ‘killer’ … . As soon as that baby’s lips touched that girl’s bosom, forget it.” Read John Rosenberg’s assessment of the fallout from Jones’s incendiary remarks.

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See you in two weeks!

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Previous Issues of Kaizen Weekly Review.

 


July 2013 Issue of Kaizen published

Tuesday, July 9th, 2013

k26-cover-250pxThe latest issue of Kaizen [pdf] features our interview with Larry Abrams. Stephen Hicks met Mr. Abrams in Houston, Texas, to discuss his wide-ranging investments in bio-tech, energy, his first novel, and his work as a producer on films such as C.H.U.D. and By the Sword.

Also featured are guest speaker Marta Podemska-Mikluch, the Sports Studies Conference organized by professors Shawn Klein and Michael Perry, and three accomplished students from the Business and Economic Ethics course — Daniela Medrano, Lucas Peterson, and Yuyang Zhao.

Print copies of Kaizen are in the mail to CEE’s supporters and are available at Rockford University.

Our next issue will feature an extended interview with Argentine entrepreneur Enrique Duhau.

More Kaizen interviews with leading entrepreneurs are at our site here.