Archive for August, 2012

Quit Your Tech Job and Get a Ph.D. in the Humanities?

Thursday, August 30th, 2012

In his keynote address at the 2011 BiblioTech Conference at Stanford, serial entrepreneur and current Google in-house philosopher Damon Horowitz outlines why business needs more humanistic thinking. He believes that people who take the time to clarify their life’s meaning, cultivate critical thinking, and develop a unique perspective have a strong advantage in any field of business.  “About a decade ago,” Horowitz says, “I quit my technology job to get a Ph.D. in philosophy. And that was one of the best decisions I ever made.”

Via Open Culture.

Text version of Horowitz’s address.

Watch the video of his address below:

CNBC’s List of 10 Inventions that Killed Businesses

Monday, August 27th, 2012

Innovation is an important component of entrepreneurship. Sometimes a product or service is so innovative and creates so much value for its customers that it makes an entire industry obsolete. Here is CNBC’s list of ten such inventions.

Neil Gaiman’s Advice for Creative Entrepreneurs

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Great advice from author Neil Gaiman for those pursuing creative careers. What traits do successful creative entrepreneurs have?

Source and a summary of Mr. Gaiman’s speech here.

Shawn Klein Interviewed by The New York Times

Monday, August 13th, 2012

CEE Professor Shawn Klein was interviewed by another major publication, The New York Times, on sports ethics. The article discusses bending the rules in sports, and whether an athlete who has attained sports excellence has necessarily attained moral excellence.

Read the New York Times article here.

Read Professor Klein’s article at his Sports Ethicist blog.

Shawn Klein on the Ousted Olympic Badminton Players

Monday, August 6th, 2012

Bloomberg interviewed CEE professor Shawn Klein on the recent badminton scandal at the Olympics. Four players were disqualified for losing on purpose, which they apparently did in order to play against weaker opponents in future matches, increasing their chances at winning a medal. “You have to play hard, you can’t just mail it in,” [Dr. Klein] said in a telephone interview. “But as I think about it more and what sports is, rules of the game and good sportsmanship, I started wondering when is it appropriate to kick them out of the game and is it really that wrong?”

Read the article here.

Peter Thiel’s Stanford Course on Startups

Monday, August 6th, 2012

Silicon Valley entrepreneur Blake Masters has posted in essay format his detailed notes from Peter Thiel’s Stanford course on startups. Mr. Thiel is the co-founder of PayPal, the first outside investor in Facebook, a venture capitalist, and hedge fund manger. Readers will find lots of great information on the history of startups, the tech startup bubble, the thought processes of founders, and how to begin. For example: “The path from 0 to 1 might start with asking and answering three questions. First, what is valuable? Second, what can I do? And third, what is nobody else doing?”

Read the notes here.